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Sony Xperia Miro: Officially launched in India at Rs. 15,249/-

Sony Xperia Miro

Sony Xperia Miro has been available online in India since last week, the Japanese giant has officially launched the device in India yesterday, pricing it at Rs. 15,249 (MRP).

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Specifications:

Also known as Sony ST23i, Sony ST23a

General 2G Network GSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900
3G Network HSDPA 900 / 2100 – ST23i
HSDPA 850 / 1900 / 2100 – ST23a
SIM Mini-SIM
Announced 2012, June
Status Available. Released 2012, September
Body Dimensions 113 x 59.4 x 9.9 mm (4.45 x 2.34 x 0.39 in)
Weight 110 g (3.88 oz)
– Touch-sensitive controls
Display Type LED-backlit LCD, capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Size 320 x 480 pixels, 3.5 inches (~165 ppi pixel density)
Multitouch Yes, up to 2 fingers
Protection Scratch-resistant glass
– Anti-reflective coating
Sound Alert types Vibration; MP3 ringtones
Loudspeaker Yes
3.5mm jack Yes
Memory Card slot microSD, up to 32 GB
Internal 4 GB storage (2.2 GB user available), 512 MB RAM
Data GPRS Up to 86 kbps
EDGE Up to 237 kbps
Speed HSDPA, 7.2 Mbps; HSUPA, 5.76 Mbps
WLAN Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct, DLNA, Wi-Fi hotspot
Bluetooth Yes, v2.1 with A2DP, EDR
USB Yes, microUSB v2.0, USB On-the-go support
Camera Primary 5 MP, 2592 x 1944 pixels, autofocus, LED flash,
Features Geo-tagging, touch focus, face and smile detection, 3D sweep panorama
Video Yes, VGA@30fps, continuous autofocus, video light, video stabilizer
Secondary Yes, VGA
Features OS Android OS, v4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)
Chipset Qualcomm MSM7225A
CPU 800 MHz Cortex-A5
GPU Adreno 200
Sensors Accelerometer, proximity, compass
Messaging SMS(threaded view), MMS, Email, Push Email, IM
Browser HTML5
Radio Stereo FM radio with RDS
GPS Yes, with A-GPS support
Java Yes, via Java MIDP emulator
Colors Black, Pink, White with silver, White with gold
– SNS integration
– MP4/H.263/H.264 player
– MP3/eAAC+/WAV player
– TrackID music recognition
– Google Search, Maps, Gmail,
YouTube, Calendar, Google Talk
– Document viewer
– Voice memo/dial/commands
– Predictive text input
Battery Standard battery, Li-Ion 1500 mAh
Stand-by Up to 470 h (2G) / Up to 545 h (3G)
Talk time Up to 5 h (2G) / Up to 6 h (3G)
Music play Up to 36 h 30 min
Misc Price group Rs. 15,249/-

 

 

REVIEW:

Introduction

In a world full of phones you wish you could afford, the Sony Xperia miro is one you don’t have to wish too hard for. In honesty, Sony didn’t work themselves too hard, but when you’re putting together a portfolio from scratch, you want it built on solid foundations.

The Xperia miro is another simple package joining the ranks, filling in the blank space between the Xperia tipo and the Xperia go. The miro is a notch above the tipo, and costs an extra few bucks – Sony went about it strictly by the book without taking unnecessary risks.

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Sony Xperia miro official pictures

The looks of the Xperia go – minus the rugged treatment – with the Xperia tipo’s internals. It’s a fairly straightforward mixture that will also fill the price gap between the starter package and the rugged smartphone. Lots of choice for different budgets is the secret to a large and loyal user base.

Let’s have a look now at all the features and the possible deal-breakers.

Key features

  • Quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE and dual-band UMTS support
  • 7.2 Mbps HSDPA and 5.76 Mbps HSUPA
  • 3.5″ 16M-color LED-backlit LCD capacitive touchscreen of HVGA resolution (320 x 480 pixels) at around 165 ppi
  • Android OS v4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich
  • 800 MHz Cortex-A5 CPU, Adreno 200 GPU, Qualcomm MSM7225A chipset
  • 512 MB of RAM
  • 4GB of inbuilt storage (2.2GB user available)
  • microSD slot (32GB supported)
  • 5 MP autofocus camera, single LED flashlight, geotagging, smile detection, touch focus
  • VGA video @ 30fps
  • Secondary VGA front-facing camera
  • Wi-Fi b/g/n, Wi-Fi hotspot
  • GPS with A-GPS
  • Accelerometer and proximity sensor
  • Standard 3.5 mm audio jack
  • Stereo FM radio with RDS
  • microUSB port (charging) and stereo Bluetooth v2.1
  • 1500 mAh Li-Ion battery

Main disadvantages

  • Middling screen quality
  • Non-hot-swappable microSD slot
  • No hardware shutter key
  • No DivX/XviD support
  • Occasional lags in the user interface
  • Mediocre audio output

The major improvements over the Xperia tipo are the bigger LED-backlit screen, the higher-res camera and the secondary cam for video calls. The screen is the same size and resolution as the Xperia go’s but isn’t the Bravia-backed Reality display we’ve seen on a number of Sony and Sony Ericsson handsets.

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Sony Xperia miro live pictures

That and the single-core CPU, as well as the non-rugged build, has helped the Xperia miro lower the price considerably. Overall though, it’s clearly a bet on the safe side – the Xperia miro is perfectly on par with its main competitors. So let’s give this fella a chance and see what it’s really made of.

Unboxing the Xperia miro

The Xperia miro’s retail package contains only the basics. We’ve been there with the Xperia tipo – a charger and a USB cable is all you get.

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The Xperia miro retail box

There is no headset or a microSD card, though lots of fan videos on YouTube show the presence of a headset. We guess all retail boxes (unlike our review package) will come with a headset inside after all.

Sony Xperia miro dimentions

The Sony Xperia miro looks very much like the rugged Xperia go – it’s nearly the same shape and size and has similar measurements. It weighs 110 g and stands at 113 x 59.4 x 9.9 mm.

 

Sony Xperia miro design and build quality

The Sony Xperia miro returns to the signature rectangular design of the NXT line – we don’t think the rounded corners did the Xperia tipo much of a favor. The finish is simple and inexpensive but by no means of poor quality. In fact, the back of the handset doesn’t feel as coarse as on the Xperia go and the tipo, which is earning the miro a few bonus points.

The styling is very clean and simple. The trademark chin creates a very subtle bulge around back – as opposed to the perfectly flat rear panel of the Xperia go. This allows are more comfortable and secure hold, especially when you need to loosen your grip on the phone to reach all the way down to the capacitive controls below the screen.

Above the screen, a proximity sensor and a status LED are hidden within the bezel. The VGA front-facing camera is to the left of the earpiece.

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Front cam and earpiece

Below the HVGA display is the usual arrangement of three capacitive controls. The Back, Home and Menu keys are sufficiently-spaced and haptic-enabled. A tap and hold on the Home key will launch the task switcher. Right below the Home key there is a hidden status LED that glows while you charge the phone, blinks upon an incoming call and does a breathing effect as you you turn the screen on.

A dedicated app from the Google Play store will let you further customize the status LED’s behavior. It will integrate with some of the phone’s apps and offer more notifications with customizable color.

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Touch-sensitive Back, Home and Menu keys below the screen

The left side features the microUSB port. The volume rocker is at the very top on the right. The very thin single button has surprisingly good press.

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The sides of the Xperia miro

The lock/power key and the 3.5mm audio jack are at the top.

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The 3.5mm jack and power key

At the bottom we find the mic pinhole and a lanyard eyelet.

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The bottom of Xperia miro

At the back of the Sony Xperia miro we find the 5MP camera lens and the LED flash. The loudspeaker is just below the Xperia logo.

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The camera lens and the loudspeaker

The battery cover wraps around the sides of the phone and fits firmly in place, with little to no gap where the two halves meet. Underneath, the SIM and microSD slots are outside the battery compartment but are not accessible unless you remove the battery.

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A peak under the battery cover

The Xperia miro seems more than reasonably powered by a 1500 mAh battery, which is rated at up to 470 h of 2G stand-by or up to 545 h of 3G idling. Talk time stands at 5h (2G) and 6h (3G) – not too impressive but still it should be enough for a day or two.

Display

The Sony Xperia miro has the same display size and resolution as the Xperia go – a 3.5″ HVGA LED-backlit LCD unit. WVGA screens would occasionally be available in this price range, but we’re not sure the Xperia miro’s GPU would’ve coped with the higher resolution.

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Sony Xperia miro’s dislay

The image quality is nothing to talk about really. Contrast looks fine and colors are quite vibrant but there’s nothing you can do about the low resolution. Fine text is where it fails particularly bad – fonts in widgets and icon labels look bad. With no BRAVIA engine on board, you can’t enjoy the software image enhancement Sony is offering on other phones.

Here go the Xperia miro results from our traditional display tests. You can find more about the testing routines here.

Display test 50% brightness 100% brightness
Black, cd/m2 White, cd/m2 Contrast ratio Black, cd/m2 White, cd/m2 Contrast ratio
Sony Xperia miro 0.24 235 998 0.52 515 993
HTC Desire V 0.33 340 1027 0.48 506 1054
Sony Xperia tipo 0.75 561 751
HTC Desire C 0.23 186 814 0.5 360 723
HTC One X 0.15 200 1375 0.39 550 1410
Sony Xperia U 0.35 287 831 0.55 515 930
Samsung S7500 Galaxy Ace Plus 0.27 239 873 0.6 528 888
Samsung Galaxy Pocket 0.31 238 774 0.62 468 753
Samsung Galaxy Y 0.40 247 624 0.72 471 625

Handling

The compact and lightweight Sony Xperia miro is a pleasure to handle. The rubbery finish and the subtle chin at the back provide commendable grip. The handset is well put together and the simple finish looks durable.

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The Sony Xperia miro held in hand

User interface: Ice Cream Sandwich styled by Sony

The Sony Xperia miro runs Android 4.0 out of box, just like most of the Xperia smartphones we have reviewed recently. The interface is still covered head to toe by the custom skin that Sony used to style Android ever since Gingerbread.

 

 

The Sony Xperia miro has the usual five-pane homescreen configuration, without an option to add or remove panes. There are four docked shortcuts (two on either side of the launcher shortcut). These are visible on all five homescreen panes and are user configurable: they can be either single icons or folders with multiple items in them.

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The Sony Xperia miro UI

Speaking of folders, one of the differences is that they’re now displayed a bit differently – they show thumbnails of the first four items in them. Not a major change, but gives you quick peek of what’s inside.

The homescreen does a neat trick called Overview mode. Pinch to zoom out on any of the 5 homescreen panes and a new screen opens up with a cool transition. All active widgets are displayed in a type of floating cloud, and selecting one takes you to the homescreen where that widget is located.

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The Overview mode helps you find the widget you are looking for

The Xperia miro has some custom-made Sony widgets in addition to the standard set. Those include the Timescape widget (alongside its dedicated app) and a Mediascape-like widget for photos and videos (the actual app isn’t there anymore, the standard gallery is back).

Adding a widget is done through a special scrollable interface which displays all available widgets. To browse through them, you have to scroll up or down and tap on the one you want, which places it on your currently selected homescreen. To remove it, simply hold and drag the widget to the trashcan icon which appears on the bottom of the screen.

The widget selector can be a little tedious if you’re trying to go to a specific widget, but is a great way to see what you have available to you.

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Widgets menu • Selecting and adding widgets

A cool new addition to the lockscreen missing from Xperia phones of old is the music player widget, which lets you control music playback without unlocking the phone. You can also enable Face, Pattern, PIN or Password unlock, in ascending order of security.

The standard notification area is present and accounted for, although for some reason it isn’t accessible from the lockscreen as it usually is on ICS (and on other ICS-running Xperia phones).

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The lockscreen • Lockscreen options • The standard notification area

Social phonebook

The visually customized phonebook of the Xperia miro is virtually the same as on vanilla Android and can store extensive contact information. A tabbed interface allows you to access your contact list, recent calls, and info from social networking services.

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The phonebook • The quick contacts can save you a click or two • the available options

The contact list can be sorted by either first or last name. There are two contact search options – a dedicated search field on top of the contact list, and an alphabet scroll to jump to names starting with a specific letter.

Quick contacts are enabled – a tap on the contact’s photo brings up shortcuts for calling, texting or emailing the contact.

You can sync with multiple accounts, including Exchange and Facebook, and you can selectively show or hide contacts from certain accounts (you can fine-sift specific groups from an account), or set the phonebook to display only contacts with phone numbers or only contacts that are online.

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Filtering contacts in the phonebook

If a contact has accounts in multiple services, you can “link” their details to keep everything in one place. Their Facebook photos and interests (part of the Facebook integration) will show as extra tabs.

Each contact can have a variety of fields (and repeat fields of the same type), there’s an Add field button and the X button lets you remove fields as needed. The fields cover anything from names (including a field to write the name down phonetically) to addresses, nicknames and notes.

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Viewing and editing a contact

There is an option to redirect calls directly to voicemail, and custom ringtones are enabled too.

Capable, but quiet telephony

Receiving and making calls on the Xperia miro was trouble-free. Calls were reasonably loud and clear even in noisy environments.

The phone app features smart dialing which searches for matches in both the contacts’ phones and names. The call log is integrated in the dialer – it shows a list of recently dialed, received and missed calls in the top half of the screen and the keypad on the bottom half. Once you start typing, the call log is replaced by the smart dial list. You can hide the keypad the make more room for the call log.

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Smart dialing is available only for numbers

Thanks to the proximity sensor, the Sony Xperia miro automatically disables the touchscreen when you lift it up during a call.

We also ran our traditional loudspeaker test on the Sony Xperia miro, and the results weren’t bad. With xLOUD turned off the phone got a Below Average mark but turning xLOUD on turns it into a whole other beast entirely. If you often miss your calls, we suggest keeping this option on at all times. More info on our loudspeaker test can be found here.

Speakerphone test Voice, dB Pink noise/ Music, dB Ringing phone, dB Overal score
Sony Xperia sola 60.9 59.0 61.7 Below Average
Sony Xperia miro (no xLOUD) 65.0 62.1 66.6 Below Average
Sony Xperia tipo 65.7 61.7 71.8 Below Average
Apple iPhone 4S 65.8 64.5 74.6 Average
HTC Desire C 64.6 64.7 75.7 Average
Samsung Galaxy mini 2 S6500 69.7 66.6 71.5 Average
Sony Xperia miro (xLOUD) 69.7 64.6 75.9 Good
Sony Xperia Go 68.7 65.8 76.2 Good
Sony Xperia neo L 65.8 65.4 76.9 Good
Motorola RAZR XT910 74.7 66.6 82.1 Very Good
HTC Desire 76.6 75.7 84.6 Excellent

The usual messaging integration

Text messages and MMS use a standard threaded layout. Each thread is displayed as an IM chat session, with the most recent message at the bottom. You can manage individual messages (forward, copy, delete) and even lock them against deletion.

Search is enabled to locate a specific message in all conversations and you can also activate delivery reports.

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The messaging app

Adding multimedia (photos, videos, sounds, etc.) will convert the message to an MMS.

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Composing a message • Attaching an image automatically makes it an MMS

Moving on to email, the Gmail app supports batch operations, which allow multiple emails to be archived, labeled or deleted. The app supports multiple Gmail accounts, but there’s no unified inbox for other email services.

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Gmail app supports batch operations and multiple (Gmail) accounts

However, the generic email app can do that as well. It can handle multiple POP or IMAP accounts and you have access to the messages in the original folders that are created online.

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The generic Email client has a combined inbox option

Google Talk handles Instant Messaging. The GTalk network is compatible with a variety of popular clients like Pidgin, Kopete, iChat and Ovi Contacts.

As for text input, the Xperia miro offers a customized on-screen full QWERTY keyboard. Typing on the portrait keyboard is not as convenient as on some of the larger screens seen in the Xperia line, but is still fairly comfortable.

Flipping the phone to landscape gives you even bigger, easier to press buttons.

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Xperia miro keyboard

You can also try the so-called Gesture input if hitting those keys individually doesn’t give you the desired typing speed. It works the same as Swype, and even if you’ve never used Swype input before, you’ll quickly get used to it.

The Album gallery is here

The Xperia miro comes with the new Sony gallery, called Album, which is now available on most Ice Cream Sandwich Xperia smartphones.

It has a whole new interface where images are arranged into stacks of thumbnails and sorted by date. You can also opt to show all of your albums in one place. There are three tabs above the stacks – Pictures, Map and Online.

Pictures is the main tab – you can use pinch gestures to make the thumbnails bigger or smaller. Map reminds us of the iOS gallery, where all pictures with a Geo-tag are shown on a map of the world.

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The Album gallery

The Online tab uses pictures from the connected online services – Google Picasa, Facebook, etc. You have options to tag, like and comment on Facebook photos much like you did with the previous Xperia Gallery.

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Geo-tagging in the Album gallery

Images in both galleries can be cropped or rotated. Quick sharing via Picasa, Email apps, Facebook, Bluetooth or MMS is also enabled.

Video player leaves much to be desired

Sony has added a new video player as well. It’s dubbed Movies and it too has a completely redesigned interface. It’s connected to Gracenote, which helps you find additional information about the movies you have preloaded.

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Watching a video on the Xperia miro

Codec support is almost non-existent – you can play MP4 and 3GP files. DivX and XviD videos were a no go and so were AVI files.

You can download a video player off the Google Play Store with support for more video codecs but chances of getting a video (one not shot with the phone itself) to play smoothly are pretty slim.

Walkman player

Coming to complete the trio of redesigned Sony apps is the new Walkman music player. It retains all the functionality of the older music players but adds a little bit extra here and there.

It is divided into Playing and My music panels.

In the My music section, you can update your album art and music information like album, year, and more. SensMe is included, meaning you can filter your songs by type – upbeat, energetic, mellow, dance, etc. Creating playlists is enabled and you can also view your Facebook buddies’ activity if they too use the Walkman player.

The Now Playing screen offers the standard music controls, shortcuts to the library, “Infinity” key and the song cover art. The Infinity key lets you quickly look up a song on YouTube or browse for the lyrics, among others.

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The Walkman music player

Currently, the only available visualization is the album art.

Finally, the Walkman player offers support for customizable equalizer settings, giving die-hard audiophiles the chance to fiddle around with the individual EQ bands.

While the rest of the music player is the same as what we saw on Sony Ericsson handsets, this one adds music controls to the lockscreen. They replace the clock, which might be annoying if you just want to check the time. Still, the clock slides out of view, so you have about a second to see what time it is (or just look at the small clock in the upper right corner).

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Music player controls on the lockscreen and notification area

FM radio with RDS and TrackID

The Sony Xperia miro is equipped with an FM radio, which has a neat and simple interface. It automatically scans the area for the available stations and places “notches” on the frequency dial for easier scrolling to the next station. There’s a Force mono option to use in case of poor reception.

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The FM radio app • TrackID

The TrackID service is also available and works within the radio app. You can even like a song on Facebook.

Mediocre audio quality

Unfortunately, the Sony Xperia miro shares its audio-related internals with the Xperia tipo. This means that you’d be getting rather uninspiring output, and pretty low volume levels.

When connected to an active external amplifier the Xperia miro got only average scores, and imperfect frequency response. All this combined with the poor volume adds up to a mediocre overall performance.

The good news is there’s little degradation when headphones come into play. Stereo crosstalk rises only a little, but since it was quite high to begin with, you are only left with an average reading. The distortion levels remain under control and better than many other smartphones we have seen, but the rest of the readings are still only average and the volume levels leave lots to be desired.

And here come the full results so you can see them for yourselves:

Test Frequency response Noise level Dynamic range THD IMD + Noise Stereo crosstalk
Sony Xperia miro +0.13, -1.28 -75.4 77.5 0.019 0.098 -76.9
Sony Xperia miro (headphones attached) +0.50, -0.85 -75.5 77.4 0.021 0.144 -65.9
Sony Xperia tipo +0.12, -1.22 -75.9 78.2 0.018 0.119 -79.1
Sony Xperia tipo (headphones attached) +0.43, -0.85 -76.0 78.1 0.020 0.154 -52.4
Sony Xperia go +0.03, -0.05 -86.7 87.0 0.0084 0.019 -87.3
Sony Xperia go (headphones attached) +0.44, -0.10 -84.8 85.3 0.421 0.364 -71.7
Sony Xperia U +0.03, -0.04 -87.3 87.5 0.0091 0.020 -87.7
Sony Xperia sola +0.03, -0.04 -81.6 82.2 0.085 0.185 -83.5
Sony Xperia sola (headphones attached) +0.45, -0.10 -81.8 81.8 0.189 0.416 -52.8
Sony Xperia U (headphones attached) +0.45, -0.10 -86.4 86.6 0.393 0.352 -66.5
Samsung Galaxy Ace 2 I8160 +0.20, -0.27 -88.7 87.6 0.0086 0.018 -88.9
Samsung Galaxy Ace 2 I8160 (headphones attached) +0.37, -0.08 -88.6 87.6 0.044 0.221 -57.9
Samsung S7500 Galaxy Ace Plus +0.14, -1.30 -88.2 88.1 0.010 0.065 -84.1
Samsung S7500 Galaxy Ace Plus (headphones attached) +0.12, -1.12 -86.0 88.1 0.018 0.186 -43.1

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Sony Xperia miro frequency response

You can learn more about the whole testing process here.

Camera is as plain as it gets

The Xperia miro has a 5 megapixel auto-focus snapper and coupled with a single LED flash. It’s capable of producing stills with a resolution of 2592 x 1944 pixels.

The camera interface features two taskbars on either side of the viewfinder. On the left you get four shortcuts to various settings, while the still camera/camcorder toggle, the virtual shutter and a thumbnail of the last photo taken are on the right.

The menu key brings up two pages of extra settings – scenes, resolution, smile detection, geotagging, image stabilization and focus mode among others. You can customize three of the shortcuts on the left (the shooting mode shortcut is fixed).

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The new camera interface

There are five capture modes to choose from: Normal, Scene recognition, Sweep Panorama, Sweep Multi Angle and 3D Sweep Panorama. In Normal, you pick the Scene settings manually or you can enable Scene recognition and let the Xperia miro take a guess.

The 3D Sweep Panorama is business as usual – you press the shutter key and pan the phone across the scene. The resulting panoramic photo can be viewed in both 2D and 3D (on a compatible TV).

The Sweep Multi Angle is much more impressive – you take a photo in the exact same way, but the result is very different. It produces something like a lenticular card, providing a different perspective when viewed at an angle.

The Xperia miro has the megapixel count to be considered a decent cameraphone but not the image quality to back that up. Images come out overly contrasty with low levels of detail while colors have a bluish tint. Noise levels aren’t too bad, but to achieve them the miro applies overly aggressive noise reduction, which eradicates a lot of fine detail.

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Sony Xperia miro camera samples

Overall, the Xperia miro is a major step back from other 5 MP Xperia smartphones like the sola, U, go, etc.

Image quality comparison

The standard test shots from the Xperia miro are in our Photo Compare Tool database. We’ve aligned it against the Xperia sola and the Desire C but you’re free to pit it against the large number of available devices we’ve tested.

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Sony Xperia miro in our Photo Compare Tool

Okay video recording

The Sony Xperia miro captures VGA video at around 25 fps, which is all we can expect out of a single-core processor and a 5MP camera.

The camcorder has the same interface as the still camera and some of the same settings.

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Switching to camcorder mode

Videos are recorded in MP4 files with a bitrate of 2 Mbps and stereo AAC sound (133Kbps, 48kHz). The resolved detail isn’t great, as expected from a VGA shooter, but at least the videos are smooth. Sadly, once again, the colors are off more often than not.

 

Basic connectivity

The Sony Xperia miro has quad-band 2G and dual-band 3G. Mobile data speeds are boosted by 7.2Mbps HSDPA and 5.76Mbps HSUPA.

Local connectivity is covered by Wi-Fi b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct with DLNA, USB on the Go support, and there’s also Bluetooth 2.1 with A2DP on hand.

The miro comes with Sony’s Smart Connect manager, which can be set to perform certain actions whenever a accessory is connected, or during certain times of the day. For instance, you can set it to start the music application whenever headphones are plugged in, or set the phone to silent at night.

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Smart Connect gives you some cool automation options

Android browser

One of the biggest advantages that the Sony Xperia miro gets from running Android ICS is the updated web browser. This browser has a streamlined interface, incognito browsing and other cool features.

The browser interface is quite minimalistic; all you get is a URL bar with a tabs shortcut. Hitting the Menu key gives you more options – Refresh, Forward, Save to bookmarks, Share page, Find on page, full settings and a couple of more – Request desktop site (no more hunting for that “Desktop” option buried at the bottom of the site) and Save for offline reading.

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The web browser has been redesigned

The full settings menu includes some really interesting options. For example, you can set your search engine to Yahoo or Bing, you can adjust text size and the level of which double tap will zoom in.

The browser borrows several features from its desktop counterpart. For example, when searching for something, if the browser is confident you’ll click on a certain search result, it will start preloading that page right away so that it opens faster if you do click it. You can set this feature to work over Wi-Fi only to preserve data.

The other trick is Incognito mode – there’s no global setting, but you can open individual Incognito tabs.

Speaking of tabs, the tab switching interface looks exactly like in the Recent apps list. You can even close tabs by swiping them off the screen.

Quick controls (available from the Labs settings) reveal five controls (New tab, Tabs, URL, Bookmarks, More) when you slide your finger in from the side. Those really improve the browser experience. Another cool feature from Labs is Full screen, which squeezes out a little more screen real estate by hiding the status bar.

Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro
The Quick controls

Flash is not available on the Xperia miro. In order to use it and watch Flash videos you’ll need to side-load the Adobe Flash player from somewhere.

Great organizational tools

The Sony Xperia miro comes with a solid set of organizing options, including a document viewer.

The app in question is the OfficeSuite viewer and it has support for viewing document files (Word, Excel, PowerPoint and PDF, including the Office 2007 versions). If you want edit as well as view, the Pro version (a $15/€13 update) can do that.

Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro
The OfficeSuite document viewer

Reading documents is reasonably comfortable and panning is blazing fast. There’s built-in file browser and cloud storage integration (Google Drive, Dropbox, Box and SugarSync).

Tap on the Manage my files button and you get into the full-blown file browser. It can do all the basic stuff (new folder, copy, delete, etc.), plus batch operations, search for files and ZIP multiple files and folders.

The calendar has three different types of view – daily, weekly and monthly. The lower section of the screen is reserved for a list of upcoming events. Adding a new event is quick and easy, and you can also set an alarm to act as a reminder.

Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro
The organizer centerpiece – the calendar

The Calendar also pulls info on upcoming events from your Facebook account. Facebook events appear just like regular calendar entries but you can’t edit them on the phone, they are read-only.

There is also a calculator aboard. It is nicely touch optimized – the buttons are really big and easy to hit. You can expand advanced functions (trigonometry, logarithms).

Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro
Regular Calculator • Scientific Calculator

The alarm clock app supports multiple alarms, each with its own start and repeat time. The Alarms app can also work as a desk clock – you have a big toggle for the brightness, as well as weather info and shortcuts to gallery slideshow and the music player. There’s no world clock, stopwatch or timer though.

Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro
The Clock • Creating alarm

Finally, the Sony Power Saver app lets you automate certain power saving functions for your device, such as whether to dim the display or disable certain connectivity features when the battery falls below a certain level.

Sony Xperia Miro
The Power Saver app

Offline Google Maps and navigation

The Sony Xperia miro comes with a GPS receiver, which took about a minute to get satellite lock upon a cold start. You can use the A-GPS functionality to get near instantaneous locks. Alternatively, network positioning will do if you only need a rough idea of your location.

Google Maps is a standard part of the Android package and we’ve covered it many times before. It offers voice-guided navigation in certain countries and falls back to a list of instructions elsewhere.

3D buildings are shown for some of the bigger cities and you can use two-finger camera tilt and rotate to get a better view of the area.

Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro
Google Maps

Google Maps uses vector maps, which are very data efficient. The latest version has an easy to use interface for caching maps – you just choose “Make available offline from the menu” and pan/zoom around until the desired area is in view (there’s an indicator showing how much storage caching that area will take). You can later view cached areas and delete ones you no longer need.

Note that there’s a limit to the size of the area you can cache – you can’t just make the entire United States available offline, not even a single state. We managed to fit New York and some surrounding area before Maps told us the area is too big. Also, there’s no address search in the cached maps and you can only cache map data in supported regions of the world.

Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro
Making an area of the map available for offline usage is very easy

You can plan routes, search for nearby POI and go into the always cool Street View. The app will reroute you if you get off course, even without a data connection.

Google Play meets all your needs

The Sony Xperia miro runs ICS, so it has access to most of the latest apps, but the limited amount of app storage means you’ll need to be careful with large apps or move a lot of the apps to a microSD card.

The Store is organized in a few scrollable tabs – categories, featured, top paid, top free, top grossing, top new paid, top new free and trending. The in-app section is untouched though and it’s very informative – a description, latest changes, number of downloads and comments with rating. There are usually several screenshots of the app in action, and oftentimes a demo video as well.

Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro Sony Xperia Miro
The Google Play Store

There are all kinds of apps in the Google Play Store and the most important ones are covered (file managers, navigation apps, document readers etc.), so if you wish you could do something more with your phone, odds are it’s in the app store.

 

Final words

The Sony Xperia miro is made exactly by the book – just not sure whose book it is. It seems all major manufacturers have near identical offers in the Android low-end. And while Sony is only catching up, some makers have had the time to perfect the entry-level smartphone concept.

To be fair to the Xperia miro though, it’s on the spot considering the most recent competitors in this price range, and it looks no worse than most – however subjective that is.

The HTC Desire comes with ICS of course and has the same screen size and resolution. It’s marginally more compact though, which is mostly down to less screen bezel – and no fancy status LED. The processor is the same, only clocked lower at 600 MHz. More importantly though, the two are very well built and equally comfortable to use. The current pricing is slightly in the Desire C’s favor.

HTC Desire C
HTC Desire C

The LG Optimus L5 is based on the same MSM7225A chipset, but costs a bit less than the Xperia miro and comes with a bigger 4″ display. The bigger screen is not a clear-cut advantage though considering the resolution stays the same. The rest of the specs are identical, from the OS version to the imaging capabilities.

LG Optimus L5 E610
LG Optimus L5 E610

As usual, Samsung aren’t short of options in this class either. The Xperia miro finds itself tightly squeezed between the Galaxy Ace Plus and the Galaxy Mini 2. None of them has ICS though – Samsung promised JB updates, but did not say when.

Samsung Galaxy mini 2 S6500 Samsung Galaxy Ace Plus S7500
Samsung Galaxy mini 2 S6500 • Samsung Galaxy Ace Plus S7500

Entry level smartphones will be enjoying increasing demand and no maker can afford to not do anything about it. Starting strong with the NXT line, it seemed one possible route for Sony was to maintain a small but focused portfolio around the upper midrange. Exactly what HTC were doing at one point. Look at them now – they have generations of entry-level droids and are no stranger to dual SIMs.

So Sony too recognized the need to spread its portfolio wider. Entry-level and low-end smartphones are not exciting stuff but they end up in many pockets through carriers. To people in the know, who are willing to go SIM-free, the Xperia U is an absolute no-brainer, offering a dual-core CPU, a high-res screen and HD videos for the price of an Xperia miro.

Sony Xperia U
Sony Xperia U

That’s not how this game is played though and manufacturers know it. They’re keen to bring new players in and entry-level handsets like the Xperia miro are the invitation. Borrowing and mixing DNA from the Xperia go and the tipo, Sony have filled the price gap between the two – and given potential users more choice. As things look though at this point, the choice in the Android low-end boils down to brands, not specs.

 

 

Courtesy: GSM Arena

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Sony’s Latest Xperia U, Xperia P And Xperia sola

Sony Launches Xperia U, Xperia P And Xperia sola

 

 

Sony Mobile has launched three new Xperia smartphones – UP, and sola, in India today. This was the official launch after they were announced last month, when we had a chance to take a first look at the three models. They still come with Android 2.3 (Gingerbread), although the world has been moving fast to ICS. However, Sony says that an update will be made available by June this year.

The Xperia U and P smartphones with large touchscreens belong to the higher-end Xperia NXT line-up of next generation mobile phones, whereas the sola is a mid-range phone. Meant to deliver a better multimedia experience, these phones feature the Mobile BRAVIA Engine.

The Xperia U comes with a 3.5″ display with pixel dimensions of 854×480 and is powered by a 1 GHz dual-core CPU with 512 MB RAM. It sports a 5 MP auto-focus rear camera with LED flash and a secondary VGA camera for video calling. With 8 GB (4 GB user-accessible) internal memory it lacks a microSD card slot for expandability. The Xperia P has a 4″ (960×540) touchscreen and is powered by the same CPU as the Xperia U. It comes with an 8 MP rear camera sporting LED flash in addition to a front VGA camera, and 16 GB (13 GB user-accessible) internal memory, with no microSD expandability.

The Xperia sola is an NFC-ready model, and has a 3.7″ touchscreen. Powered by the same CPU as the other two models, it has 8 GB (5 GB user-accessible) internal memory, which is expandable to 32 GB. An additional 50 GB of lifetime cloud storage has been made available by the company with each of the models. The Sony Xperia U, P, and sola are priced at Rs 17,400, Rs 25,800, and Rs 20,500, respectively. The Xperia P will be launched later this month, while the other two models are available as of now.

Earlier this year we saw a flurry of devices being launched. Among those were Sony‘s new lineup consisting of the Xperia S, Xperia P, Xperia U and the Xperia sola. While Sony recenly launched the Xperia S in India, we take a quick look at what the other devices have to offer.

Sony Xperia U

Sony Xperia U

Sony Xperia U

The Xperia U, basically is the younger sibling of the Xperia P. With a screen size of 3.5” and pixel dimensions of 480×854, it is powered by a 1 GHz dual-core CPU and 512 MB of RAM. The build quality is fairly okay with its plastic body. The design of the phone is very similar to its elder brothers the Xperia S and P, with a translucent strip at the bottom with navigation buttons. Another interesting feature of the Xperia U, is that the translucent strip changes its colours based on the colour saturation of the content on the screen. Looks pretty cool.

The phone interface was fairly smooth, with a very slight noticeable lag, nothing that would mar your experience. Similar to the Xperia P above, the Xperia U was also running Android 2.3 (Gingerbread). It has a 5 MP camera and offers 720p video recording. It also has a dedicated camera button, which is just as hard to use as with the Xperia P.

Previously known as Sony Ericsson ST25i Kumquat

GENERAL 2G Network GSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900
3G Network HSDPA 900 / 2100 – ST25i
HSDPA 850 / 1900 / 2100 – ST25a
Announced 2012, February
Status Available. Released 2012, May
BODY Dimensions 112 x 54 x 12 mm
Weight 110 g
– Touch-sensitive controls
DISPLAY Type LED-backlit LCD, capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Size 480 x 854 pixels, 3.5 inches (~280 ppi pixel density)
Multitouch Yes, up to 4 fingers
Protection Scratch-resistant glass
– Sony Mobile BRAVIA Engine
– Timescape UI
SOUND Alert types Vibration; MP3 ringtones
Loudspeaker Yes
3.5mm jack Yes
– Sony 3D surround sound audio technology
MEMORY Card slot No
Internal 8 GB, 512 MB RAM
DATA GPRS Up to 107 kbps
EDGE Up to 296 kbps
Speed HSDPA 14.4 Mbps, HSUPA 5.76 Mbps
WLAN Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Wi-Fi hotspot, DLNA
Bluetooth Yes, v2.1 with A2DP, EDR
USB Yes, microUSB v2.0, USB On-the-go support
CAMERA Primary 5 MP, 2592 x 1944 pixels, autofocus, LED flash
Features Geo-tagging, touch focus, face and smile detection, 3D sweep panorama, image stabilization
Video Yes, 720p@30fps, video light
Secondary Yes, VGA
FEATURES OS Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread), planned upgrade to v4.0
Chipset STE U8500
CPU Dual-core 1 GHz
GPU Mali-400MP
Sensors Accelerometer, proximity, compass
Messaging SMS (threaded view), MMS, Email, IM, Push Email
Browser HTML5, Adobe Flash
Radio Stereo FM radio with RDS
GPS Yes, with A-GPS support
Java Yes, via Java MIDP emulator
Colors Black, White/ exchangeable bottom caps in white, black, pink, yellow
– SNS integration
– Active noise cancellation with dedicated mic
– MP4/H.263/H.264/WMV player
– MP3/eAAC+/WMA/WAV player
– Google Search, Maps, Gmail,
YouTube, Calendar, Google Talk
– Organizer
– Document viewer
– Voice memo/dial/commands
– Predictive text input
BATTERY Standard battery, Li-Ion 1320 mAh
Stand-by Up to 260 h (2G) / Up to 472 h (3G)
Talk time Up to 6 h 36 min (2G) / Up to 5 h 36 min (3G)
Music play Up to 45 h
MISC Price group     Rs 17,400

OVER-ALL

Good: 

  • Dual core processor
  • High pixel densitiy screen, over 250ppi (280 ppi)
  • Fast processor (1000 MHz)

Bad :

  • Lacks microSD slot for storage expansion

Sony Xperia P

Sony Xperia P

Sony Xperia P

The Xperia P has a 4″ screen with pixel dimensions of 540×960 and is powered by a 1 GHz dual-core CPU, coupled with 1 GB of RAM. The build quality of the phone seems sturdy and it has a nice brushed aluminium finish, which makes it less of a finger print magnet. The  display was bright enough with decent colour reproduction.

Using the phone was breeze, as it has a very snappy interface with hardly any lag or framing. The phone I used was running Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) and with no ICS update in sight yet, this does feel like a dampener of sorts. It boasts of an 8 MP camera with 1080p video recording, since it was an indoor location, the resulting low light images seemed fairly okay. However, I found the dedicated camera button to be hard to use, as it required a considerable amount pressure to operate.

Previously known as Sony LT22i Nypon

GENERAL 2G Network GSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900
3G Network HSDPA 850 / 900 / 1900 / 2100 – LT22i
Announced 2012, February
Status Available. Released 2012, May
BODY Dimensions 122 x 59.5 x 10.5 mm
Weight 120 g
– Touch-sensitive controls
DISPLAY Type LED-backlit LCD, capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Size 540 x 960 pixels, 4.0 inches (~275 ppi pixel density)
Multitouch Yes, up to 4 fingers
Protection Scratch-resistant glass
– Sony WhiteMagic technology
– Sony Mobile BRAVIA Engine
– Timescape UI
SOUND Alert types Vibration; MP3 ringtones
Loudspeaker Yes
3.5mm jack Yes
MEMORY Card slot No
Internal 16 GB (13 GB user-available), 1 GB RAM
DATA GPRS Up to 100 kbps
EDGE Up to 296 kbps
Speed HSDPA 14.4 Mbps, HSUPA 5.76 Mbps
WLAN Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Wi-Fi hotspot, DLNA
Bluetooth Yes, v2.1 with A2DP, EDR
NFC Yes
USB Yes, microUSB v2.0, USB On-the-go support
CAMERA Primary 8 MP, 3264×2448 pixels, autofocus, LED flash
Features Geo-tagging, touch focus, face and smile detection, 3D sweep panorama, image stabilization
Video Yes, 1080p@30fps, continuous autofocus, video light
Secondary Yes, VGA
FEATURES OS Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread), planned upgrade to v4.0
Chipset NovaThor U8500
CPU Dual-core 1 GHz Cortex-A9
GPU Mali-400MP
Sensors Accelerometer, gyro, proximity, compass
Messaging SMS (threaded view), MMS, Email, IM, Push Email
Browser HTML5, Adobe Flash
Radio Stereo FM radio with RDS
GPS Yes, with A-GPS support
Java Yes, via Java MIDP emulator
Colors Silver, Black, Red
– SNS integration
– HDMI port
– Active noise cancellation with dedicated mic
– MP4/H.263/H.264/WMV player
– MP3/eAAC+/WMA/WAV player
– Google Search, Maps, Gmail,
YouTube, Calendar, Google Talk
– Organizer
– Document viewer
– Voice memo/dial/commands
– Predictive text input
BATTERY Standard battery, Li-Ion 1305 mAh
Stand-by Up to 470 h (2G) / Up to 475 h (3G)
Talk time Up to 6 h (2G) / Up to 5 h (3G)
Music play Up to 80 h
MISC Price group   Rs.  25,800

OVER-ALL

Good:

  • Dual core processor
  • High pixel densitiy screen, over 250ppi (275 ppi)
  • High-resolution display (540 x 960 pixels)
  • Fast processor (1000 MHz)
  • Lots of RAM (1024 MB RAM)
  • High-resolution camera (8 megapixels)

Bad:

  • Lacks microSD slot for storage expansion

Sony Xperia sola

Sony Xperia sola

Sony Xperia sola

Finally we come to the Xperia sola, it looks like a standard Android phone when you first look at it, however it does offer something different than the rest, but more on that later. The sola comes with a 3.7″ screen with pixel dimensions of 854×480, and features a 1 GHz dual-core CPU under the hood. It has a 5 MP camera with 720p video recording. It has a dedicated camera button too, which is again hard to use. On the design front it stands out from the Xperia P and Xperia U as it drops the translucent navigation bar, in favour of a slightly beveled design with standard capacitive touch buttons.

What sets the sola apart is the “floating touch” technology. So what does it do? Basically, it helps you highlight objects on the screen without actually touching the it. You just need to hover your finger slightly above the screen. Seems fairly cool, right? The only drawback is that can’t be used for navigating the device. It currently works only with the default browser, and that too only for highlighting text links. We are hoping this would change by the time the device finally hits the stores.

Previously rumored as MT27i Pepper.

GENERAL 2G Network GSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900
3G Network HSDPA 850 / 900 / 1900 / 2100
Announced 2012, March
Status Available. Released 2012, May
BODY Dimensions 116 x 59 x 9.9 mm
Weight 107 g
– Touch-sensitive controls
DISPLAY Type LED-backlit LCD, capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Size 480 x 854 pixels, 3.7 inches (~265 ppi pixel density)
Multitouch Yes, up to 4 fingers
Protection Scratch-resistant glass
– Floating touch display
– Sony Mobile BRAVIA Engine
SOUND Alert types Vibration; MP3 ringtones
Loudspeaker Yes, with stereo speakers
3.5mm jack Yes
– 3D surround sound enhancement
MEMORY Card slot microSD, up to 32 GB
Internal 8 GB (5 GB user available), 512 MB RAM
DATA GPRS Up to 100 kbps
EDGE Up to 296 kbps
Speed HSDPA, 14.4 Mbps; HSUPA, 5.76 Mbps
WLAN Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, DLNA, Wi-Fi hotspot
Bluetooth Yes, v3.0 with A2DP, EDR
NFC Yes
USB Yes, microUSB v2.0, USB Host
CAMERA Primary 5 MP, 2592х1944 pixels, autofocus, LED flash
Features Geo-tagging, touch focus, face and smile detection, 3D sweep panorama, image stabilization
Video Yes, 720p@30fps, continuous autofocus, video light
Secondary No
FEATURES OS Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread), planned upgrade to v4.0
Chipset NovaThor U8500
CPU Dual-core 1 GHz Cortex-A9
GPU Mali-400
Sensors Accelerometer, proximity, compass
Messaging SMS (threaded view), MMS, Email, IM, Push Email
Browser HTML5, Adobe Flash
Radio Stereo FM radio with RDS
GPS Yes, with A-GPS support
Java Yes, via Java MIDP emulator
Colors Black, White, Red
– SNS integration
– Active noise cancellation with dedicated mic
– MP4/H.263/H.264/WMV player
– MP3/eAAC+/WMA/WAV player
– Google Search, Maps, Gmail,
YouTube, Calendar, Google Talk
– Document viewer
– Voice memo/dial/commands
– Predictive text input
BATTERY Standard battery, Li-Ion 1320 mAh
Stand-by Up to 470 h (2G) / Up to 475 h (3G)
Talk time Up to 6 h (2G) / Up to 5 h (3G)
Music play Up to 40 h
MISC Price group    Rs 20,500
TESTS Camera Photo / Video

OVER-ALL

Good: 

  • Smooth performance
  • Pretty interface
  • Dual-core processor

Bad: 

  • Photo quality is average
  • Front-facing cam would have been nice
  • Gingerbread at launch

Sony Xperia S : Review

Sony Xperia S : Review

Review in short:

As tech consumers, we’ve currently got a rather odd ‘problem’: there’s just too much good stuff out there. Nowhere is that more true than with phones; the adoption of Android, fast processors and uniformly smart looks means it’s hard for anything to stand out.
Take this phone, for instance. The Sony Xperia S is very fast, slick, has a large screen without feeling too big and does just about everything you need from a modern smartphone. It’s in the top tier, yet it’s weirdly hard to get excited about because there are so many other good phones either already available or imminent, including the Samsung Galaxy Nexus and the LG Optimus 4X HD. Does it really have enough to make it into our list of the best smartphonesaround?

Sony Xperia S: Screen

First up, the 4.3-inch screen with Bravia tech – this phone is festooned with big hitting Sony tech sub-brands, by the way. It’s extremely vivid and bright, whether you’re looking at video, photos or surfing the web.

Some of you may prefer the more naturalistic look of, for instance, the Apple iPhone 4S‘s screen, but for anyone hooked on OLED displays, this is the nearest LCD has got to that kind of vibrant, luminescent psychedelia.

Sony Xperia S: Camera

As a result, on the screen, two- to 12-meg photos and 1080p movies shot on the Xperia S’ camera have a slightly hyper-real quality. Whip them off on to a TV or computer screen and they look more conventional, but still of very high quality for a phone, being detailed, bright even in low-ish light, and with decent sharpness.

The camera also has a dedicated button and is ready to shoot in pretty short order. All told, it’s better than the Samsung Galaxy S2 and up there with the iPhone 4S.

Arguably the iPhone’s photos across a range of different shooting conditions are of slightly higher quality, but the Xperia S has a number of extra, useful features, such as a timer, and less useful but fun stuff such as 3D panoramas. And it has more megapixels in it, which is, of course, essential.

Sony Xperia S: Build

Design is one of the areas where the Sony Xperia S falls down. The Android buttons are unresponsive and hard to find, the feel is solid rather than inspiring, and the one little flourish – a see-through, light-up strip below the buttons – is just naff, really.

Sony Xperia S: Features

One day, the built-in NFC capability will turn the S into a travel pass and debit card. Right now, you can exchange documents with it and scan tags. So tap it on the “bedroom” tag and Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and the ringtones turn off, while the alarm app turns on. For some reason, tapping again in the morning doesn’t have the reverse effect. Tags are user-programmable, though.

Sony Xperia S: Music, movies, game

Phones are now essentially platforms rather than standalone gadgets, and the Xperia S delivers as a source of games, movies and music.

Google Play (formerly Market) is second only to the App Store as a retailer of software nuggets, and having cut loose from Ericsson, Sony is also unleashing its full arsenal of entertainment options, with PlayStation certification, Music Unlimited and Video Unlimited.
Music Unlimited is a subscription-based Spotify clone. Video Unlimited is not aNetflix-style subscription service but actually an iTunes-style buy/rent one. Presumably “Video Unlimited as long as you keep bunging us 2 or 3 quid a time to watch said Video” was deemed to have not quite the same ring to it.

As you’d hope from the Walkman men, Sony’s music app is great. Cover Flow-style album art means it looks good (nobody actually browses their music like that though, do they?) and the audio is a bit like the screen in that it is very punchy, loud and vibrant rather than necessarily “accurate” – no bad thing, in this case.

The video and music options both offer a decent selection and pricing on a par with their rivals. We’d still use Lovefilm, Netflix, Spotify and Amazon’s MP3 Store before either, mind.

The PlayStation “certification” and associated app are what should really make Sony phones stand out, but the whole thing remains pretty half-baked. Are people really gagging to play the crusty likes of Crash Bandicoot on their phones?

There’s promise here, but not much delivery as yet. However, things can only get better, and there are plenty of non-Sony titles at Google Play (the app store formerly known as Android Market), with the 1.5GHz dualcore and 1GB RAM well up for ’em.

Sony Xperia S: Performance

We’re a little disappointed that the OS on board is ropey old Gingerbread rather than thrusting, virile Ice Cream Sandwich – an upgrade is promised “in Q1”, so presumably within the month; makes you wonder why Sony didn’t just wait a few weeks to release this.

However, Gingerbread runs with no lag, offering a level of slickness comparable to the more expensive iPhone and as good or better than any Android phone currently on the market.

We also had a few issues with Mac compatibility: we could barely get any music on to it from an iMac running Snow Leopard via Sony’s hapless Bridge for Mac software.

Sony Xperia S: Battery

Battery life is fine. Despite the use of a sealed rather than removable battery you’ll need to charge once a day, but that’s par for the course. The storage is also ‘sealed’, in the sense that there’s 32GB built in but no microSD – come on, 32GB is plenty.

Sony Xperia S: Verdict

The above niggles aside, there’s nothing very wrong with the Sony Xperia S and a lot that’s very right. All told, it’s probably the best Android handset you can get right now, unless you insist on Ice Cream Sandwich and a massive screen, in which case the Samsung Galaxy Nexus trumps it.

We’d still choose the iPhone over it most days, but the gap between Apple’s phones and cheaper Android alternatives such as this is being sandpapered down to wafer thinness.

The headline news from Sony’s star-studded press event as CES 2012 was the arrival of the first smartphone since the company bought out Ericsson’s half of the partnership.

The Sony Xperia S and Sony Xperia ION are the first devices of the new Sony Mobile Communications era, but the one we’re concerned with its the Xperia S which will be coming to the UK in March this year, with Three Mobile the first network to sign up. We were able to get some hands-on time at a packed Sony stand. Some of the pictures in our gallery will still show the Sony Ericsson branding.

Sony Xperia S: Build

The first really noticeable change is the new Sony branding at the top of the device. There’s something about that Sony font which instantly makes a device look a little more premium and this is the case with the Xperia S.

The Xperia S is a good looking phone, on its own merits. we were able to play with the white edition, which is definitely the more attractive than the black iteration of the device and its matte finish will stay nicely free of fingerprints. We really loved the see-through strip at the bottom of the device, which also houses the home, menu and back soft-keys and the phone’s antenna system. It’s a really nice design touch and sets it aside from rivals.

When we picked up the device, it wasn’t overly comfortable. The curved back on the Xperia line does fit nicely in the palm, but the very defined square edges offset that somewhat when gripping the device. Overall, it felt a little awkward. There’s also a physical camera button, volume keys and a HDMI port tucked behind a dedicated flap.

Sony Xperia S: Features

The new Sony handset will not arrive with Android Ice Cream Sandwich on board, but Sony says there’ll be an upgrade in the near future. Instead early adopters will be greeted with Android 2.3 Gingerbread. As with other phones in the Xperia range, like the Sony Xperia Arc, the UI is very Android centric. There’s no skin like on HTC and Samsung Android phones and Sony Ericsson has long ditched the Timescape UI, which was a good idea in theory but didn’t really work in practice.

Sony Ericsson cameras have always been an area of the phone’s that we can be positive about and the Sony Xperia S is no different, bringing a 12-megapixel offering which also offers some neat shot-to-shot technology which almost eliminates the shutter-lag between taking pictures. In terms of video, the device will shoot 1080p, a la the iPhone 4S. There’s also an Exmor sensor on-board. Very fancy.

There’s also a boon for gamers as the device is PlayStation certified, meaning you’ll be able to access the library of old PlayStation titles just like Xperia Play owners. It’ll also focus its attentions on the Sony Entertainment Network with apps like Music Unlimited and Movies Unlimited. It’ll also be able to throw content to your TV set in the same way AirPlay does on iOS devices.

Sony Xperia S: Screen

Continuing the trend of whopping Android screens, the Xperia S has a 4.3-inch, 1280×720 resolution screen that brings the Sony Bravia Mobile engine into play. Screen detail is fantastic, colours are engaging and well represented, but the display is by no means as encapsulating as the Samsung Galaxy S2‘s Super AMOLED offering or the Apple iPhone 4S‘s Retina Display.

Sony Xperia S: Performance

With a 1.5GHz dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon MSM8260 processor and the now-standard 1GB of RAM on-board the device is rather nippy and during our brief test performed really well. Whizzing around the Android operating system was a breeze, while video rendered very quickly and web-pages loaded at a better-than-expected-for-a-showroom-floor speed. More testing is needed in this area to give a definitive verdict.

Sony Xperia S: Verdict

Sony believes this new era can resurrect its ailing smartphone brand and the Xperia S appears to be a good start. With Sony going it alone in the smartphone world we’d expect more distinct designs from the company in the near future. However, it’s clear that this device was still designed while the Ericsson partnership remained intact. Some of the phones on display here, as you can see from our photos, still boasted the Sony Ericsson branding.

The Xperia S, on its own merits, is a feature packed phone which continues the company’s recent run of excellent Android devices. The camera is one of the best-specced we’ve ever seen on an Android device, while it’s also got plenty in the engine room to keep things ticking over. We enjoyed the lack of an over-bearing UI and for the most part we impressed by the design. The grip isn’t particularly natural however.

Sony Xperia S review

GOOD

  • Powerful and fast
  • Good stills and full-HD video
  • Decent media/app hubs

BAD

  • Mediocre design
  • PlayStation bits disappoint
  • No Ice Cream Sandwich

Full Reviews:

Sony’s split with Ericsson is as much a cultural break as a corporate one, and the Xperia S on the surface reflects that. It’s a showcase for the company’s design and technology. But with the split just months old, has Sony’s mobile team learned its lesson? Our Sony Xperia S review will decide whether Sony can hold its own, or if pressure from HTC, Samsung, and Apple is still fierce.

Design and the display

The Sony design aesthetic is certainly taking over the Xperia S’ external looks. Gone are the swoops, curves, and shine of Sony Ericsson days. In its place, Sony has implemented an almost extremely minimalist design that’s both very matte and very rectangular: it’s one of the few phones we’ve ever seen that can stand upright without help. We’re fans of the understated look, especially as it has dropped Sony Ericsson’s tendency towards fake chrome and brushed metal. Some will appreciate the multi-color notification light to let you know of new messages or similar updates.

There are a handful of quirks. The surfaces are fairly smudge-prone, both front and back. It’s easy to clean off, but it can mean heavy use in a given day will be all too clear when you get home. Sony’s design is also rounded at the back; while it will stay flat when put down on the table, we noticed that it can rock to the side if you tap the screen with too much enthusiasm.

If there’s any overt flash to the design, it’s at the bottom. Sony has implemented a transparent rim around the chin that you can’t help but notice. It’s even slightly practical: the area briefly lights up whenever you wake it up or do something such as open a menu, which can be handy in a darkened nightclub when you’re trying to find the controls.

The control layout is decidedly mixed. We like the placement of the volume rocker, and Sony has an appreciated dedicated camera button to go straight to the camera app even when the phone is locked. However, we’re not fans of the sleep/wake placement, which forces you to stretch your finger or shift your hand upwards. The capacitive Android navigation keys at the bottom are occasionally problematic, too. Sony has put the symbols for the controls on the transparent strip, not the actual touch area; there are dots to indicate where you need to touch, as well as haptic (vibration) feedback, but it’s slightly counterintuitive and is implemented in a way that seems occasionally unresponsive.

Expansion, thankfully, is seldom an issue. While there’s no microSD slot, the Xperia S we’re using ships with 32GB built-in along with 1.5GB of dedicated phone space, so it’s enough to handle most common use without running dry. The lack of a slot has the upshot of giving a lot of contiguous storage for apps and media due to a file system change. You won’t run into the common Android problem of having multiple gigabytes of wasted space. Only about 26GB is free due to OS overhead, but it’s more than most.

Our core complaints are the ports. Micro HDMI and micro USB are located on the sides of the phone behind somewhat clumsily opened covers. As much as it helps to keep the ports free of damage, it both takes more effort to plug in and precludes any kind of real docking system. We’re not as perturbed by the normally non-removable battery, in part as there are unofficial techniques to replace it if it dies. It’s mostly a limit if you’re a frequent user and don’t want to use a USB external pack to top up.

As is becoming increasingly common, the display is the centerpiece here. Getting a 720p (720×1280) mobile display isn’t new — we’ve seen them in the HTC Vivid and Samsung Galaxy Nexus — but it’s one of the few under 4.5 inches, if only just at 4.3. As such, it has even more of a Retina Display-like effect than either iOS devices or larger counterparts. Sony’s upcoming Xperia ion for AT&T has a 4.5-inch panel with the same resolution, so the Xperia S is in some ways beating Sony itself.

In some ways, it’s very pleasing to look at. The pixel density is of course the first draw. In ideal situations, the colors have just the right balance of rich colors without being oversaturated, and is definitely better head-on than the Galaxy Nexus’ slightly “fuzzy” Pentile AMOLED screen. We’d add that the 4.3-inch size is a better fit for those who like to use their phones one-handed, as it’s easier to reach the top of the screen, even if the on-screen keyboard isn’t quite as comfortable.

Not all is flawless, however, and we noticed a conspicuous problem with viewing angles. You only need to tilt the phone slightly for the image to start washing out, and while it’s still usable, it’s not as consistently good as other LCD or AMOLED panels. Sony might have brought elements of its TVs’ Bravia image processing engine to the smartphone world, but the display could use some stepping up.

Android 2.3, Timescape, NFC tags, and upgrading to Android 4.0

Sony has sometimes been chastised for at times epitomizing the flaws of customized Android builds. While it toned things down with 2011 phones like the Xperia Play, some elements of its interface were still overwrought. Its social networking in its own interface layer, Timescape, was the definition of this: like most such apps, it was built on the assumption someone would only ever have a few dozen friends, and fell apart with the way people actually use Facebook or Twitter.

There have been some steps forward since then, both in the social side and overall. Now, the friends widgets are focused on either tracking just a few constant favorites or on the raw feed. Many widgets appear more centered on being functional than flash. The music player app is now more conspicuously useful with quicker (and prettier) access to common categories, and the bottom app shortcut tray is now transparent, giving more of a sense of breathing room. The app drawer is easily sorted by name or date added. Generally, we like navigating in Sony’s space more than we did last year.

The most practical addition comes at the lock screen. Somewhat similar to certain Android layers and iOS 5, certain notifications now show before you’ve unlocked the phone; swipe an e-mail notice and it takes you directly to that app. Very few apps qualify for the notification, however, and Sony has made the somewhat odd decision to make the slide-to-unlock control’s alternate function a mute function. It’s admittedly a common task, but we’d like it to be a common app or a customizable space.

All these are meaningful changes, but at the same time, the overriding sense is of a few minor changes rather than a fundamental revision. Some of the customizations are still welcome, such a two-pane mail client in landscape mode and a keyboard that has Swype-like gesturing. But it feels like a mild change when the audience was looking for an overhaul, with some elements still needing a fix or not really adding anything. The photo widget isn’t very useful, many of the widgets bog the phone down, and the Apple Exposé-like home screen view simply tosses all the widgets into one screen as they float around disconnected from their context. Sony ought to take a cue from HTC’s One series. Pare the custom layer back, focus on where it’s truly useful; don’t “differentiate,” just make it better or leave it alone.

There’s also the concern of Android 2.3 itself. The OS is certainly solid, but it’s now a year and a half old, and only slightly changed in the revisions that followed since Sony (then Sony Ericsson) started using it. Sony had promised that Android 4.0 would come out soon after the Xperia S launched, and we commend it for at least preparing an update. That said, it’s hard to sympathize given that HTC is shipping its core 2012 lineup at the same time with Android 4.0 from the start. And in our experience with Android 4.0, there are fewer and fewer reasons to customize the OS as a whole; even in December, the Galaxy Nexus had more powerful e-mail clients, some extra features like Face Unlock, and overall senses of polish and power that some have said was missing in stock Android until now.

Sony’s approach to NFC (near-field communication) is somewhat emblematic of this. Like LG, it’s bundling a set of its own tags, here called Xperia SmartTags, to provide a sort of extra-phone shortcut. Pass the phone by one of the tags and it can trigger multiple tasks at once, akin to Motorola’s Smart Actions. You can have the phone turn on Wi-Fi when you get home, for example, or launch a remote control app for a networked audio system. It can be handy, but we found it a decidedly niche way to get things done; if you’re not near one of the tags, that automation is lost to you.

With the SmartTags the only real immediate use for NFC on the phone apart from a limited photo sharing feature, it’s hard to advocate for NFC as a feature on the Xperia S until Android 4.0 arrives. We can count the number of times we’ve used Android Beam information sharing on one finger, but it’s still a more universal feature, and it’s joined by Google Wallet support if you’re an American with either a Sprint-edition Galaxy Nexus or the or unlocked HSPA+ version. It’s better that Sony have NFC than not; it’s just that the SmartTags are more an attempt to justify hardware than a meaningful inclusion at this stage.

Performance and data speeds

On paper, the Xperia S is fast, and in some senses it is. A dual-core 1.5GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor still means a responsive Android overall. However, it’s the previous-generation Snapdragon from late 2011, and that puts an inherent cap on its potential with a 2012 launch. You won’t get the newer, 28-nanometer architecture of the similarly-clocked Snapdragon S4 in a phone like the HTC One S (or North American One X), nor will you get the faster graphics that have come in a number of mobile chips since then.

That’s somewhat borne out by our testing. Android benchmarking has been criticized for its on-the-ground utility, and not without good cause, but it can show the gaps in speed between some phones. Our test units managed 3,109 points in the general-purpose Quadrant test, 1,242 in the Vellamo browser benchmark, and 59.6 frames per second in Qualcomm’s own NeoCore 3D benchmark. All are respectable scores, but they put the phone only slightly above the Galaxy Nexus, which feels subjectively faster.

Compare this to the HTC One phones with the Snapdragon S4 inside, and the difference is much wider. Quadrant on a One S will manage roughly 5,000 points. We broke out the SunSpider browser test from the Vellamo suite and a fairly modest 2,681ms. That’s respectable and competes well against most late 2011 Android 2.3 phones. Next to any Android 4.0 phone, though, it’s plodding; an HTC One phone will get under 1,800ms even with the stock browser, and the Galaxy Nexus’ code optimization helps it get under 2,000ms. We’d add that scores usually get even better when using Chrome for Android, which isn’t an option on Android 2.3.

In regular use, there are fewer complaints. For simply navigating around Android and most 2D apps, the Xperia S is perfectly brisk. Apart from the widget slowdown we mentioned earlier, it’s smooth throughout much of Android and in 2D apps. In the web browser and some 3D games, though, you’ll notice that it’s not quite as smooth as it could be. Scrolling and zooming in the stock browser is responsive, but not especially fluid. A game like Wind-Up Knight loses a small but noticeable amount of the frame rate versus other phones. These are hardly major complaints, and it’s still very much a competent phone. It’s just that competitors have either moved on or were faster to start with.

Internet speeds are strictly middling for the modern era. Sony is using 14.4Mbps HSPA much like the iPhone 4S, and gets similar if not slightly slower results. On a fully capable network, we were getting speeds of about 4.7Mbps to 5.3Mbps downstream, and 1.8Mbps to 2Mbps upstream. They’re respectable and provide a usable Internet experience. Compared to the 21Mbps HSPA+ in the Galaxy Nexus or the LTE in the Galaxy Note, though, it’s just not as quick as it ought to be for a phone released in mid-2012.

If you’re American, we should add that the Xperia ion will carry LTE. Even as early-era 4G gives us worries about battery life, it’s a worthwhile consideration if Internet speed is important.

Camera app and image quality

What stands out in photography on the Xperia S isn’t so much the camera app itself as how quickly you can get to it. As we mentioned, the hardware camera button will skip directly to the app. It’s a technique borrowed primarily from Windows Phone 7, but a welcome one if you catch a sudden moment on the street or at a concert. You can even set the phone to automatically take a picture as soon as it’s woken into this state, although that for us mostly resulted in blurry photos; we set the app back to letting us compose the shot first.

Once inside, though, the app is simple and makes some unusual choices about how to reach common camera settings. If you use the camera shortcut button, it always reverts to the fully automatic scene detection mode, negating any custom settings you have set for when you normally launch the app. When in the normal mode, the only quick access to an advanced setting is exposure compensation; the top level emphasizes scene presets and multiple flash modes (more on those shortly). ISO sensitivity, metering, white balance, and other similar controls require first bringing up the contextual menu and then diving in, which seems artificially slow. While there’s a risk to having too many features on the top level, it feels like Sony’s current app goes a bit far in the opposite direction.

Regular shooting isn’t significantly more advanced than the pre-4.0 stock Android camera app. Sony will let you set the phone to shoot when you tap, but there’s no tap to focus like there is on the iPhone and a few Android phones. It’s possible to do an off-center focused shot by half-pressing the shutter and panning the camera, but you can’t point the Xperia S to a specific subject for focus and metering, let alone bring in autoexposure or autofocus lock like you might on an iPhone.

Despite sharing what’s in some ways the same eight-megapixel, backside-illuminated CMOS sensor as the iPhone 4S, the Xperia S’ image quality is much more hit-or-miss. Its specialties are macros and well-lit outdoor scenes. Colors are very accurate and vibrant, focus is reasonably quick, and close-ups produce a pleasingly soft background through a shallow depth of field. However, we found that the Xperia S’ hardware was considerably less tolerant of low light, often becoming too noisy and blurry where the iPhone could still have a chance at a usable, if imperfect, photo. The front camera isn’t as good, either. Shot-to-shot times are reasonably quick, although you’ll want either a Galaxy Nexus or an HTC One series phone if you value speed in an Android phone.

Sony deserves some compliments for the sophistication of its flash system. Along with regular flash, options exist for a red eye-reducing flash strobe as well as a fill flash for scenes that aren’t necessarily completely dark but may have undesirable shadows. We’d ideally take something like HTC’s smart flash, which can tell when it needs to tone down the brightness. Still, the option is appreciated.

As you might expect from a company where cameras are a focus, panorama modes are an option. The regular mode is a typical sweep mode, where the phone is guided in an arc and the images are stitched together reasonably well as long as there isn’t heavy action in the scene. An additional option lets you shoot a pseudo-3D panorama by using the rapid-fire shooting to generate a pseudo-stereoscopic 3D view, although with no 3D display on the phone and 3D displays still uncommon among TVs and PCs, it’s hard to use.

Click for full-size version

Video recording quality is a surprising positive. Unlike a lot of phones in the category, it preserves a lot of the quality and still looks sharp with a minimum of artifacts, even while the camera pans. Audio isn’t immune to wind noise, but it can pick up a good amount of ambient sounds without being overwhelmed. Continuous autofocus is normally rather slow, although it’s possible to simplify the autofocus and metering to speed this up — useful if you know you’ll have subjects at varying distances.

If there’s a limitation to video, it’s simply that it tends to be fire-and-forget; that is, you’re committed to whatever focus and settings you had when you started shooting. For most, it won’t be an issue, but it gives few choices for mid-video composition other than zoom. We’d add that going without Android 4.0 leaves the phone without a pre-supplied video editor, so most clips will be raw, unedited footage until you get to a computer or to the YouTube web editor.

Call quality and battery life

With a few exceptions, we’ve generally had a good experience with phone calls on Sony Ericsson phones, and that has kept true now that Sony is going it alone. In both directions, the audio tone felt flat, but it was consistently clear and loud. Our recipients could hear wind noise when we called outside, although they still said that the voice was clearly the most prominent part of the call. The external speaker is uncharacteristically loud, too: Sony is using processing that it calls xLoud, but which really amounts to better volume when the phone isn’t up to your ear or using headphones.

On that subject, we’d add that the stock in-ear headphones are uncommonly good for a pack-in set. You don’t, and probably shouldn’t, need xLoud to get reasonably solid voice calls or music with what Sony supplies. Multiple tips are included in the box to provide a good fit, and there’s an in-line mic and remote to let you answer a call with the phone still in your pocket. One minor quirk to be aware of: Apple’s in-ear headphones don’t register properly for unknown reasons, so don’t revert to those as a backup.

Battery life is better than we first thought, which is something of a relief given that the battery isn’t normally swappable. The Xperia S will last through a full day of moderate use, with periodic browsing, 2D apps, and a substantial voice call or two. If you use it only lightly, it can last two or even three days before the battery warning cries foul. Intensive 3D gaming or photography tends to drain the battery much faster. Like with the HSPA+ edition of the Galaxy Nexus, the Xperia S would run dry in about five hours of very heavy media recording, playback, and uploading.

Wrapping up

In some ways, the Xperia S has had more expectations thrust upon it than it really deserved. Development of the phone no doubt started well before Sony said it was buying out Ericsson’s stake in the Sony Ericsson joint venture, so to call it a “pure” Sony phone is a misnomer. What you mostly get with the finished product is a Sony Ericsson foundation with more conspicuous Sony elements layered on top. The real fruits of any change in strategy will be shown in 2013, if not later.

Taken by itself, the phone is generally accomplished. As much as we’re not fans of Timescape, the phone performs fairly well, has a sharp display, a usually good camera, and great call quality. If you’ve ever wished for distinctive looks in a smartphone that doesn’t come from Apple or Nokia, you’ll find them here. Depending on where you go, pricing can be reasonable. It won’t be hard to get the phone for free on a reasonably priced tariff if you’re European. In North America, it costs a reasonable $100 on contract at Rogers and $500 off, so if you’re enamored with the form factor or Sony ecosystem elements like the Sony Entertainment Network and PlayStation Suite, you won’t have to reach deeply to experience it.

The main obstacle, as should have become evident, is context. Sony isn’t launching the Xperia S into a void. Right away, it’s facing competition from the HTC One X and (mostly in Europe) the One S. Although the Xperia S is easier to hold than the gargantuan One X, the latter has a better overall display and is mated to a much faster processor, a better camera, and most importantly, Android 4.0 with a toned down level of customization; the One S might not have the resolution, but it has the camera, speed, and software. The Galaxy Nexus is still arguably the best Android experience: a cohesive experience, the maximum number of official features, and faster software updates. And we can’t overemphasize the irony of the best Sony camera sensor experience coming from an iPhone, not a Sony phone.

Some of these devices are more expensive, but it’s increasingly hard to argue against small differences in up front prices. If you’re paying for three years of service on Rogers, for example, the $70 more for a One X is negligible given how expensive actual service will be. Europeans may have to get a One S instead to get a good deal on a monthly rate, but we’d still seriously consider it.

As such, if there’s anything Sony is a victim of, it’s simply being mid-tier. We’d actually consider Xperia U, if and when it arrives in your area, as the Sony phone to get. It may not be as technically advanced, but the power-to-feature ratio makes the most sense. For now, the Xperia S is the most logical if you want a 720p screen and can find a good deal.

The Good

  • 720p display in modest size with good head-on color.
  • Distinctive design.
  • Rich camera quality in ideal conditions.
  • Fast in some situations.
  • Very good call and overall audio quality.
  • Solid battery life.
  • Some customizations are helpful.
  • 32GB of storage built-in.

The Bad

  • Not as fast or well-featured as some of its spring rivals.
  • Display viewing angles are poor.
  • Stuck on Android 2.3 at first.
  • Camera struggles in low light.
  • Timescape still somewhat excessive.
  • No expandable storage or removable battery.
  • Quirky navigation keys.
Sony Xperia S
MRP: 32,500
Street Price: Rs 31,000 (Flipkart.comSaholic.com) Rs 32,000 (Letsbuy.com)

Hands on

Video Review

Phone Specs:

GENERAL 2G Network GSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900
3G Network HSDPA 850 / 900 / 1900 / 2100 – LT26i
Announced 2012, January
Status Available. Released 2012, February
BODY Dimensions 128 x 64 x 10.6 mm
Weight 144 g
– Touch-sensitive controls
DISPLAY Type LED-backlit LCD, capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Size 720 x 1280 pixels, 4.3 inches (~342 ppi pixel density)
Multitouch Yes, up to 10 fingers
Protection Scratch-resistant glass
– Sony Mobile BRAVIA Engine
– Timescape UI
SOUND Alert types Vibration; MP3 ringtones
Loudspeaker Yes
3.5mm jack Yes
MEMORY Card slot No
Internal 32 GB storage, 1 GB RAM
DATA GPRS Up to 86 kbps
EDGE Up to 237 kbps
Speed HSDPA, 14.4 Mbps; HSUPA, 5.8 Mbps
WLAN Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct, DLNA, Wi-Fi hotspot
Bluetooth Yes, v2.1 with A2DP, EDR
NFC Yes
USB Yes, microUSB v2.0
CAMERA Primary 12 MP, 4000×3000 pixels, autofocus, LED flash
Features Geo-tagging, touch focus, face and smile detection, 3D sweep panorama, image stabilization
Video Yes, 1080p@30fps, continuous autofocus, video light, video stabilizer
Secondary Yes, 1.3 MP, 720p@30fps
FEATURES OS Android OS, v2.3 (Gingerbread), planned upgrade to v4.0
Chipset Qualcomm MSM8260 Snapdragon
CPU Dual-core 1.5 GHz
GPU Adreno 220
Sensors Accelerometer, gyro, proximity, compass
Messaging SMS (threaded view), MMS, Email, IM, Push Email
Browser HTML5, Adobe Flash
Radio Stereo FM radio with RDS
GPS Yes, with A-GPS support and GLONASS
Java Yes, via Java MIDP emulator
Colors White, Black
– MicroSIM card support only
– TV launcher
– SNS integration
– HDMI port
– Active noise cancellation with dedicated mic
– MP4/H.263/H.264/WMV player
– MP3/eAAC+/WMA/WAV player
– TrackID music recognition
– Google Search, Maps, Gmail,
YouTube, Calendar, Google Talk
– Document viewer
– Voice memo/dial/commands
– Predictive text input
BATTERY Standard battery, Li-Ion 1750 mAh
Stand-by Up to 450 h (2G) / Up to 420 h (3G)
Talk time Up to 7 h 30 min (2G) / Up to 8 h 30 min (3G)
Music play Up to 25 h
MISC SAR EU 1.30 W/kg (head)     0.80 W/kg (body)
Price group  Rs. 32,500
TESTS Display Contrast ratio: 1038:1 (nominal)
Loudspeaker Voice 72dB / Noise 61dB / Ring 69dB
Audio quality Noise -86.6dB / Crosstalk -86.9dB
Camera Photo / Video

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