Powered By BrainStorm

Archive for the ‘Knowledge’ Category

Compare- Nokia 6 vs Nokia 5 vs Nokia 3

 

HMD Global (Nokia) has finally launched the much-awaited new Nokia smartphones in India. The series includes three smartphones – Nokia 6, Nokia 5 and Nokia 3 – priced at Rs 14,999, Rs 12,899 and Rs 9,499 respectively. The Nokia 5 will be exclusively available with offline retailers, while the Nokia 6 will be available only with Amazon India. The Nokia 3 can also be purchased from physical retail stores.

The Nokia 3 will be going on sales starting June 16, while the Nokia 5 will be available starting July 7. Nokia 6 will be up for pre-orders from July 14. Those using Amazon Pay balance to buy the Nokia 6 will also get Rs 1,000 discount.

On the specifications front, the trio offer pure Android 7.1.1 Nougat OS experience and come with Google Assistant built-in. HMD Global has already confirmed the handsets will get Android O later this year or next year. The smartphones will be made in India, starting with Nokia 3. The company has also detailed its Nokia Mobile Care Centre plans. As a part of the service, the firm will be offering pick and drop service of the faulty/repaired handsets in 100 cities in addition to web chat and call support.

 

Nokia 3

Nokia 5

Nokia 6

Nokia 6

Nokia 5

Nokia 3

Performance Octa core Octa core Quad core
Display 5.5″ (13.97 cm) 5.2″ (13.21 cm) 5.0″ (12.7 cm)
Storage 32 GB 16 GB 16 GB
Camera 16 MP 13 MP 8 MP
Battery 3000 mAh 3000 mAh 2630 mAh
Ram 3 GB 2 GB 2 GB2 GB
SPECIAL FEATURES
Fingerprint Sensor Position Front Front
Other Sensors Light sensor, Proximity sensor, Accelerometer, Compass, Gyroscope Light sensor, Proximity sensor, Accelerometer, Compass, Gyroscope Light sensor, Proximity sensor, Accelerometer, Compass, Gyroscope
Fingerprint Sensor Yes Yes NoNo
GENERAL
Quick Charging No No No
Operating System Android v7.1.1 (Nougat) Android v7.1.1 (Nougat) Android v7.0 (Nougat)
Sim Slots Dual SIM, GSM+GSM Dual SIM, GSM+GSM Dual SIM, GSM+GSM
Model 6 5 3
Launch Date July 20, 2017 (Expected) July 15, 2017 (Expected) June 16, 2017 (Expected)
Brand Nokia Nokia Nokia
Sim Size SIM1: Nano SIM2: Nano (Hybrid)
Network 4G: Available (supports Indian bands) 3G: Available, 2G: Available 4G (supports Indian bands), 3G, 2G 4G: Available (supports Indian bands) 3G: Available, 2G: Available
Fingerprint Sensor Yes Yes NoNo
MULTIMEDIA
Audio Features Dolby Atmos
Loudspeaker Yes Yes Yes
Fm Radio Yes Yes Yes
Audio Jack 3.5 mm 3.5 mm 3.5 mm
PERFORMANCE
Chipset Qualcomm Snapdragon 430 MSM8937 Qualcomm Snapdragon 430 MSM8937 MediaTek MT6737
Graphics Adreno 505 Adreno 505 Mali-T720 MP2
Processor Octa core, 1.4 GHz, Cortex A53 Octa core, 1.4 GHz, Cortex A53 Quad core, 1.3 GHz, Cortex A53
Architecture 64 bit 64 bit 64 bit
Ram 3 GB 2 GB 2 GB2 GB
DESIGN
Build Material Case: MetalBack: Metal Case: MetalBack: Metal Case: MetalBack: Metal
Thickness 7.8 mm 8.0 mm 8.4 mm
Width 75.8 mm 72.5 mm 71.4 mm
Weight 169 grams
Height 154 mm 149.7 mm 143.4 mm
Colours Silver, Arte Black, Matte Black, Tempered Blue, Copper Silver, Tempered Blue, Matte Black, Copper Silver White, Matte Black, Tempered Blue, Copper White
DISPLAY
Display Type IPS LCD IPS LCD IPS LCD
Screen To Body Ratio 71.27% 68.52% 67.16%
Pixel Density 401 ppi 282 ppi 294 ppi
Screen Protection Corning Gorilla Glass v3 Corning Gorilla Glass Corning Gorilla Glass
Screen Size 5.5 inches (13.97 cm) 5.2 inches (13.21 cm) 5.0 inches (12.7 cm)
Screen Resolution Full HD (1080 x 1920 pixels) HD (720 x 1280 pixels) HD (720 x 1280 pixels)
Touch Screen Yes Capacitive Touchscreen, Multi-touch Yes Capacitive Touchscreen, Multi-touch Yes Capacitive Touchscreen, Multi-touch
STORAGE
Internal Memory 32 GB 16 GB 16 GB
Expandable Memory Yes Up to 128 GB Yes Up to 128 GB Yes Up to 128 GB
Usb Otg Support Yes Yes Yes
CAMERA
Settings Exposure compensation, ISO control Exposure compensation, ISO control Exposure compensation, ISO control
Aperture 2.0 F 2.0 F 2.0 F
Camera Features Digital Zoom, Auto Flash, Face detection, Touch to focus Digital Zoom, Auto Flash, Face detection, Touch to focus Digital Zoom, Auto Flash, Face detection, Touch to focus
Image Resolution 4616 x 3464 Pixels 4128 x 3096 Pixels 3264 x 2448 Pixels
Autofocus Yes Yes Yes
Shooting Modes Continuos Shooting, High Dynamic Range mode (HDR) Continuos Shooting, High Dynamic Range mode (HDR) Continuos Shooting, High Dynamic Range mode (HDR)
Resolution 8 MP Front Camera 8 MP Front Camera 8 MP Front Camera
Optical Image Stabilisation No No
Flash No No No
Video Recording 1920×1080 @ 30 fps 1920×1080 @ 30 fps 1280×720 @ 30 fps
BATTERY
User Replaceable No No No
Type Li-ion Li-ion Li-ion
Capacity 3000 mAh 3000 mAh 2630 mAh
NETWORK CONNECTIVITY
Wifi Yes Wi-Fi 802.11, b/g/n Yes Wi-Fi 802.11, b/g/n Yes Wi-Fi 802.11, b/g/n
Wifi Features Mobile Hotspot Mobile Hotspot Mobile Hotspot
Bluetooth Yes v4.1 Yes v4.1 Yes v4.0
Usb Connectivity microUSB 2.0 microUSB 2.0 microUSB 2.0
Nfc Yes Yes Yes
Network Support 4G (supports Indian bands), 3G, 2G 4G (supports Indian bands), 3G, 2G 4G (supports Indian bands), 3G, 2G
Gps Yes with A-GPS, Glonass Yes with A-GPS, Glonass Yes with A-GPS, Glonass
Sim 1 4G Bands:TD-LTE 2600(band 38) / 2300(band 40) FD-LTE 2100(band 1) / 1800(band 3) / 2600(band 7) / 900(band 8) / 700(band 28) / 850(band 5) / 800(band 20)3G Bands: UMTS 1900 / 2100 / 850 / 900 MHz2G Bands: GSM 1800 / 1900 / 850 / 900 MHz 4G Speed: 50 Mbit/s ? 150 Mbit/s ? (LTE category 4)3G Speed: HSDPA 42.2 Mbit/s ?, HSUPA 5.76 Mbit/s ?GPRS:Available EDGE:Available 4G Bands:TD-LTE 2600(band 38) / 2300(band 40) FD-LTE 2100(band 1) / 1800(band 3) / 2600(band 7) / 900(band 8) / 700(band 28) / 850(band 5) / 800(band 20)3G Bands: UMTS 1900 / 2100 / 850 / 900 MHz2G Bands: GSM 1800 / 1900 / 850 / 900 MHz 4G Speed: 50 Mbit/s ? 150 Mbit/s ? (LTE category 4)3G Speed: HSDPA 42.2 Mbit/s ?, HSUPA 5.76 Mbit/s ?GPRS:Available EDGE:Available 4G Bands:TD-LTE 2600(band 38) / 2300(band 40) FD-LTE 2100(band 1) / 1800(band 3) / 2600(band 7) / 900(band 8) / 700(band 28) / 850(band 5) / 800(band 20)3G Bands: UMTS 1900 / 2100 / 850 / 900 MHz2G Bands: GSM 1800 / 1900 / 850 / 900 MHz 4G Speed: 50 Mbit/s ? 150 Mbit/s ? (LTE category 4)3G Speed: HSDPA 42.2 Mbit/s ?, HSUPA 5.76 Mbit/s ?GPRS:Available EDGE:Available
Sim Size SIM1: Nano, SIM2: Nano (Hybrid)
Sim 2 4G Bands: TD-LTE 2600(band 38) / 2300(band 40) FD-LTE 2100(band 1) / 1800(band 3) / 2600(band 7) / 900(band 8) / 700(band 28) / 850(band 5) / 800(band 20)3G Bands: UMTS 1900 / 2100 / 850 / 900 MHz 2G Bands: GSM 1800 / 1900 / 850 / 900 MHz 4G Speed: 50 Mbit/s ? 150 Mbit/s ? (LTE category 4) 3G Speed: HSDPA 42.2 Mbit/s ? GPRS:Available EDGE:Available 4G Bands: TD-LTE 2600(band 38) / 2300(band 40) FD-LTE 2100(band 1) / 1800(band 3) / 2600(band 7) / 900(band 8) / 850(band 5) / 800(band 20)3G Bands: UMTS 1900 / 2100 / 850 / 900 MHz 2G Bands: GSM 1800 / 1900 / 850 / 900 MHz 4G Speed: 50 Mbit/s ? 150 Mbit/s ? (LTE category 4) 3G Speed: HSDPA 42.2 Mbit/s ? GPRS:Available EDGE:Available 4G Bands: TD-LTE 2600(band 38) / 2300(band 40) FD-LTE 2100(band 1) / 1800(band 3) / 2600(band 7) / 900(band 8) / 700(band 28) / 850(band 5) / 800(band 20)3G Bands: UMTS 1900 / 2100 / 850 / 900 MHz 2G Bands: GSM 1800 / 1900 / 850 / 900 MHz 4G Speed: 50 Mbit/s ? 150 Mbit/s ? (LTE category 4) 3G Speed: HSDPA 42.2 Mbit/s ? GPRS:Available EDGE:Available
PRICE & RATING
Price Expected: ₹ 14,999 Expected: ₹ 12,899 ₹ 9,299
Rating N/A N/A

 

Advertisements

Reliance Jio 4G VoLTE Supported Phones

From list of Reliance Jio 4G VoLTE supported phones you can easily find your mobile supports Jio 4G or not from here. For making HD Calls on LTE,  you must have VoLTE supported mobile – It helps you to continue HD calls over Jio 4g network without switching to 2G or 3G network.

Reliance Jio to start launch 4G service for a list of VoLTE supported mobiles from Sept 5, 2016. Jio Commercial launch to take place on January 1st, 2017. Jio is now working on network testing till Dec 31st , 2016, till then company is giving Welcome Offer to everyone having 4G phones under Jio 4g support list.

Due to Reliance Jio unlimited 4G benefits, Millions of customers are jumping into pool of 4G network. Jio 4g launch will take place in Sept 5 for all VoLTE supported phones given here.

Reliance Jio is going to serve high quality voice service over 4g network across India. Jio launches LYF mobiles with name series Earth, Water, Wind & Flame supporting both VoLTE & VoWiFi.

Which 4g Mobiles support Jio 4G Sim

Jio offer VoLTE calls for supported 4G mobile and VoWiFi calls for Jionet & JioFi. If your 4g handset supports VoLTE then you can make HD calls directly othewise JioJion app comes very handy for same service.

Also make sure your 4g phone supports any of Jio 4G bands : Band 3 (1800Mhz), Band 5 (850Mhz), Band 40 (2300Mhz).

What is VoLTE ?

VoLTE is the short form of  Voice over LTE which means HD Voice calling over LTE Network. Voice call would become clearer and superior. 4g mobile must support VoLTE feature to make HD Voice calls.

What is VoWIFi (WiFi Calling)?

VoWiFi stands for Voice over WiFi which means you can make HD calls using WiFi service using 3G or 4G mobile. Jio offers VoWiFi service under JioNet and JioFi.

Can I access Jio 4G data using 4G phone with no support for VoLTE

No matter your 4g phone supports VoLTE or VoWiFi or not, you can still access data services using Jio 4g sim – Use JioJoin app for VoLTE calls.

Way to Check if 4G phone supports VoLTE

You can easily check whether your phone has VoLTE enabled or not : Just insert Jio 4G sim > Wait until network come – You will get VoLTE sign under Status bar as well as you can

How to know which 4g mobiles support VoLTE ?

Only VoLTE supported mobiles will get access to true HD Voice call from Reliance Jio 4g network. Additional settings & updates will come from phone brand.

How to make HD calls when 4G phone has no support VoLTE ?

VoLTE is software based feature available in 4G mobile. 4Mobile brand needs to send and update to device to enable VoLTE in 4G mobile. Alternatively, you can use JioJoin app for HD Voice & Video call, if VoLTE is missing in your 4g phone.

VoLTE supported Android mobiles

Most of latest Qualcomm and MediaTek chipset support VoLTE but usually features remains hidden. A system update is required to enable volte service. Android OS version 5.1 or above as it offer customized settings for VoLTE.

List of Reliance Jio VoLTE supported 4G Mobiles

Numerous VoLTE supported phones are available in India but few of them come under Reliance Jio 4G VoLTE support list. As per list sent to us from Jio we have added mobiles in following list.

Reliance Jio 4G VoLTE supported iOS devices

iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6S, iPhone 6s Plus etc.

List of VoLTE 4g Phones under Reliance Jio Preview Offer-

Brand VoLTE Phones Phone Voice Spec
Alcatel Alcatel OneTouch X1 4G + VoLTE
Alcatel Alcatel POP3 4G + VoLTE
Alcatel Alcatel POP 4 4G + VoLTE
Alcatel Alcatel POP Start 4G + VoLTE
Alcatel Alcatel Pixi 4 4G + VoLTE
Alcatel Alcatel Pixi 5 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus Zenfone Go 5.0 LTE (T500) 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus Zenfone 2 (ZE551ML) 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus Zenfone 2 (ZE550ML) 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus Zenfone 2 Laser (ZE601KL) 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus Zenfone 2 Laser 5.0 (ZE500KL) 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus ZenFone 2 Laser (ZE550KL) 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus Zenfone 3 (ZE552KL) 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus Zenfone 3 Laser(ZC551KL) 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus Zenfone 3(ZE520KL) 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus Zenfone 3(ZS570KL) 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus Zenfone 3(ZU680KL) 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus Zenfone Max (ZC550KL) 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus Zenfone Selfie(ZD551KL) 4G + VoLTE
Asus Asus Zenfone Zoom(ZX551ML) 4G + VoLTE
Celkon Celkon Q4GPlus 4G + VoLTE
Celkon Celkon 4GTAB-7 4G + VoLTE
Celkon Celkon 4GTAB-8 4G + VoLTE
Celkon Celkon ACE 4G + VoLTE
Celkon Celkon POP 4G + VoLTE
Celkon Celkon Q4G 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee E8 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee F103(1GB) 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee F103(2GB) 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee F103(3GB) 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee M4 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee M5 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee M5 Lite 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee M5 Lite CDMA 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee M5 Plus 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee P5L 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee S Plus 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee S6 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee S6s 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee S7 4G + VoLTE
Gionee Gionee V6L 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire 626 dual Sim 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire 628 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire 630 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire 728 Dual SIM 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire 820 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire 820Q 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire 820S Dual Sim 4G + VoLTE
HTC Desire 825 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire 826 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire 826 DS 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire 828 DS 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire 830 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire Eye 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC 10 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC 10 Life style 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC One A9 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC One E9 S dual sim 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC One E9+ Dual Sim 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC One M8 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC One M8 Eye 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC One M9 Plus 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC One M9e 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC One ME Dual Sim 4G + VoLTE
HTC HTC One X9 4G + VoLTE
Huawei Huawei Holly2 Plus 4G + VoLTE
Huawei Huawei Honor 4C 4G + VoLTE
Huawei Huawei honor 4X 4G + VoLTE
Huawei Huawei honor 5C 4G + VoLTE
Huawei Huawei honor 5X 4G + VoLTE
Huawei Huawei Honor 6 4G + VoLTE
Huawei Huawei honor Bee4G 4G + VoLTE
Huawei Huawei honor6 Plus 4G + VoLTE
Huawei Huawei honor7 4G + VoLTE
Huawei Huawei Nexus 6P 4G + VoLTE
Huawei Huawei P9 4G + VoLTE
Itel Itel SelfiePro it1511 4G + VoLTE
Itel Itel Wish it1512 4G + VoLTE
Itel Itel SelfiePro it1520 4G + VoLTE
InFocus InFocus Bingo 50+ 4G + VoLTE
InFocus InFocus M370i 4G + VoLTE
InFocus InFocus M425 4G + VoLTE
InFocus InFocus M430 4G + VoLTE
InFocus InFocus M460 4G + VoLTE
InFocus InFocus M535 4G + VoLTE
InFocus InFocus M535+ 4G + VoLTE
InFocus InFocus M680 4G + VoLTE
InFocus InFocus M808i 4G + VoLTE
InFocusItel InFocus M812i 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua 4G 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua 4G Star 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua 4G Strong 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua 4G+ 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Ace 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Ace 2 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Ace Mini 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Craze 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Eco 4G 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua GenX 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Music 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Power 4G 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Raze 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua S7 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Secure 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Shine 4G 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Strong 5.1 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Super 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Trend 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Turbo 4G 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua View 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Aqua Wing 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Cloud 4G Smart 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Cloud 4G Star 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Cloud Crystal 2.5D 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Cloud Fame 4G 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Cloud Flash 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Cloud Glory 4G 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Cloud Jewel 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Cloud String HD 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Cloud String V2.0 4G + VoLTE
Intex Intex Cloud Swift 4G + VoLTE
LG LG K332 (K7 LTE) 4G + VoLTE
LG LG Stylus 2 (K520DY) 4G + VoLTE
LG LG K535D (LG Stylus 2 Plus) 4G + VoLTE
LG LGH630D (LG G4 Stylus 4G) 4G + VoLTE
LG LGH 442 (LGC70 LG Spirit LTE) 4G + VoLTE
LG LG K500I ( LG X Screen) 4G + VoLTE
LG LG H860 (LG G5) 4G + VoLTE
LG LG K520DY 4G + VoLTE
Karbonn Karbonn Aura 1 4G + VoLTE
Karbonn Karbonn Aura Power 4G + VoLTE
Karbonn Karbonn Quattro L55 HD 4G + VoLTE
Karbonn Karbonn Quattro L52 VR 4G + VoLTE
Karbonn Karbonn Quattro L51 HD 4G + VoLTE
Karbonn Karbonn Quattro L50 HD 4G + VoLTE
Karbonn Karbonn Quattro L45 IPS 4G + VoLTE
LeEco LeEco Le 1s 4G + VoLTE
LeEco LeEco Le 1s Eco 4G + VoLTE
LeEco LeEco Le Max 4G + VoLTE
LeEco LeEco Le 2 4G + VoLTE
LeEco LeEco Le Max 2 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo A6600 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo A2010 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo A2020 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo A6000 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo A6000 shot 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo A6600 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo A7000 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo A7700 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo K3 Note 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo Vibe K4 Note 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo Vibe K5 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo Vibe K5 Note 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo Vibe K5 plus 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo Vibe P1 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo Vibe P1m 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo Vibe S1 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo Vibe Shot 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo Vibe X3 4G + VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo ZUK Z1 4G + VoLTE
Lava LAVA A71 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava A72 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava A76 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava A76 Plus 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava A88 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava A89 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava A97 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava Ivory S 4g 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava V5 M 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava Pixel V2 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava V2s 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava X10 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava X11 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava X12 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava X17 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava X28 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava X38 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava X41 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava X41 Plus 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava X46 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava X50 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava X50 Plus 4G + VoLTE
Lava Lava X81 4G + VoLTE
Motorola Motorola Moto E (2nd Gen) 4G + VoLTE
Motorola Motorola Moto G (2nd Gen) 4G + VoLTE
Motorola Motorola Moto G (3rd Gen) 4G + VoLTE
Motorola Motorola Moto G3 Turbo Edition 4G + VoLTE
Motorola Motorola Moto G4 4G + VoLTE
Motorola Motorola Moto G4 Play 4G + VoLTE
Motorola Motorola Moto G4 Plus 4G + VoLTE
Motorola Motorola Moto X (2nd Gen) 4G + VoLTE
Motorola Motorola Moto X Force 4G + VoLTE
Motorola Motorola Moto X Play 4G + VoLTE
Motorola Motorola Moto X Style 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Bolt Selfie 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas 5 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas 5 Lite 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas 5 Lite Special Edition 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas 6 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas 6 Pro 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Amaze 4G 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Blaze 4G 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Blaze 4G Plus 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Evok 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Fire 4G 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Fire 4G plus 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Fire 6 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Juice 4G 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Knight 2 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Mega 2 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Mega 4G 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Nitro 4G 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Pace 4G 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Play 4G 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Pulse 4G 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Sliver 5 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Tab 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Unite 4 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Canvas Xpress 4G 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Unite 4 Plus 4G + VoLTE
Micromax Micromax Unite 4 Pro 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy A3 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy A5 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy A5 2016 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy A5 Duos 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy A7 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy A7 2016 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy A8 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy Alpha 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy Core Prime 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy Grand Max 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy J Max 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy J1 Ace 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy J2 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy J2 2016 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy J2 Pro 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy J3 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy J5 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy J5 2016 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy J7 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy J7 2016 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy K Zoom 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy S5 Plus 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy S4 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy S4 4G 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy S5 Neo 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy S6 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy S6 EDGE 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy S6 EDGE Plus 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy S7 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Galaxy S7 EDGE 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Note 3 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Note4 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Note5 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Note 5 Duos 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Note 7 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Note EDGE 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Grand Prime 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung ON5 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung On5 Pro 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung On7 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung On7 Pro 4G + VoLTE
Samsung Samsung Z2 4G + VoLTE
Sansui Sansui S50 FD45S 4G + VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia X A 4G + VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia X A Ultra 4G + VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia X(F5122) 4G + VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia Z5 Dual(E6883) 4G + VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia Z5 Premium Dual 4G + VoLTE
TCL TCL 560 4G + VoLTE
TCL TCL 562 4G + VoLTE
TCL TCL FIT 5.5 4G + VoLTE
TCL TCL Pride T500L 4G + VoLTE
OnePlus Oneplus One 4G + VoLTE
OnePlus Oneplus 2 4G + VoLTE
OnePlus Oneplus 3 4G + VoLTE
OnePlus Oneplus X 4G + VoLTE
OPPO OPPO F1 4G + VoLTE
OPPO OPPO A37 4G + VoLTE
OPPO OPPO F1 Plus 4G + VoLTE
OPPO OPPO F1s 4G + VoLTE
OPPO OPPO Neo 7 4G + VoLTE
OPPO OPPO R7k 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA A2 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA Arc 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA L 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA I2 (1GB ) 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA Arc 2 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA L2 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA I2 2GB 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA I2 3GB 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA I3 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA Switch 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA Icon T42 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA Icon 2 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA Mark 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA Turbo 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic ELUGA Note 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic P55 Novo 4G 4G + VoLTE
Panasonic Panasonic P77 4G + VoLTE
Videocon Cube 3 V50JL 4G + VoLTE
Videocon Videocon Graphite1 V45ED 4G + VoLTE
Videocon Videocon Krypton 3 V50JG 4G + VoLTE
Videocon Videocon Q1 4G + VoLTE
Videocon Videocon V50FA3 4G + VoLTE
Videocon Videocon V50FG6 4G + VoLTE
Videocon Graphite1 V45ED 4G + VoLTE
Vivo Vivo V3 4G + VoLTE
Vivo Vivo V3Max 4G + VoLTE
Vivo Vivo Y51L 4G + VoLTE
Vivo Vivo Y21L 4G + VoLTE
Xiaomi Xiaomi Redmi 2 Prime 4G + VoLTE
Xiaomi Xiaomi Redmi 2 4G + VoLTE
Xiaomi Xiaomi Mi4i 4G + VoLTE
Xiaomi Xiaomi Redmi Note 4G 4G + VoLTE
Xiaomi Xiaomi Redmi Note 3 4G + VoLTE
Xiaomi Xiaomi Mi5 4G + VoLTE
Xiaomi Xiaomi Redmi Note 4G Prime 4G + VoLTE
Xiaomi Xiaomi Mi Max 4G + VoLTE
Xiaomi Xiaomi Redmi 3s 4G + VoLTE
Xiaomi Xiaomi Redmi 3s Prime 4G + VoLTE
Xolo Xolo Black-1X M 4G + VoLTE
Xolo Xolo era 1X 4G + VoLTE
Xolo Xolo era 2X 4G + VoLTE
Xolo Xolo era 4G 4G + VoLTE
Xolo Xolo era 4K 4G + VoLTE
Xolo Xolo era X 4G + VoLTE
YU YU Yuphoria 4G + VoLTE
YU YU Yureka Note 4G + VoLTE
YU YU Yureka S 4G + VoLTE
YU YU Yureka Plus 4G + VoLTE
YU YU Yunique 4G + VoLTE
YU YU Yunique Plus 4G + VoLTE
YU YU Yunicorn 4G + VoLTE

 

 

List of VoLTE Phones working with Jio 4G Sim-

If you manage to generate Jio offer code then you will get 4G sim with following mobiles-

BRAND PHONE OFFER CODE VOLTE
Apple iPhone 6 Need to get VoLTE
Apple iPhone 6S Need to get VoLTE
Apple iPhone 6S Plus Need to get VoLTE
Apple iPhone SE Need to get VoLTE
Blackberry Priv Need to get VoLTE
Coolpad Coolpad Max Need to get VoLTE
Coolpad Mega 2.5D Need to get VoLTE
Coolpad Coolpad Note 3 Need to get VoLTE
Coolpad Coolpad Note 3 Lite Need to get VoLTE
Coolpad Nexus 5X Need to get VoLTE
Google Nexus 6 Need to get VoLTE
Huawei Honor 5A Need to get VoLTE
Huawei Huawei Ascend D2 Need to get VoLTE
Huawei Huawei Ascend P7 Need to get VoLTE
Huawei Huawei Nexus 6P Need to get VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire 524 Need to get VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire 526 Need to get VoLTE
HTC HTC Desire EYE Need to get VoLTE
HTC HTC J butterfly Need to get VoLTE
InFocus Infocus M370 Need to get VoLTE
Karbonn Karbonn Quattro L45 IPS Need to get VoLTE
Karbonn Karbonn A71 Need to get VoLTE
LG LG G3 Need to get VoLTE
LG LG K7 Need to get VoLTE
LG LG X cam Need to get VoLTE
LG LG Stylus 2 Need to get VoLTE
LG LG Spirit LTE Need to get VoLTE
LG LG Stylo/ LG Stylus Need to get VoLTE
LG LG Optimus Vu II Need to get VoLTE
LG LG Optimus LTE III Need to get VoLTE
LG LG Optimus LTE 2 Need to get VoLTE
LG LG Optimus GX Need to get VoLTE
LG LG K7 LTE Need to get VoLTE
LG LG K10 LTE Need to get VoLTE
LG LG isai VL Need to get VoLTE
LG Nexus 5X Need to get VoLTE
LG LG Google Need to get VoLTE
LG LG G4 Need to get VoLTE
LG LG G3 Need to get VoLTE
LG LG G2 Need to get VoLTE
LG LG G Pro Need to get VoLTE
LG LG G Flex 2 Need to get VoLTE
LG LG G Flex Need to get VoLTE
LG LG G3 4G LTE 32GB Need to get VoLTE
LG LG G4 Stylus 4G Need to get VoLTE
LG LG Spirit 4G Need to get VoLTE
LG LG X Cam Need to get VoLTE
LG LG K520 – Stylus 2 Need to get VoLTE
LG LG K10 Need to get VoLTE
LeEco LeEco Max 2 Need to get VoLTE
LeEco LeEco Le 2 Pro Need to get VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo Z2 Pro Need to get VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo Vibe Shot Need to get VoLTE
Lenovo Lenovo A6000 Plus Need to get VoLTE
Lumia Lumia 550 Need to get VoLTE
Lumia Lumia 640 Need to get VoLTE
Lumia Lumia 640XL Need to get VoLTE
Lumia Lumia 735 Need to get VoLTE
Lumia Lumia 830 Need to get VoLTE
Lumia Lumia 950 Need to get VoLTE
Lumia Lumia 950XL Need to get VoLTE
Micromax Canvas Sliver 5 (Q450) Need to get VoLTE
Micromax Canvas Mega 2 Q426 Need to get VoLTE
Nextbit Nextbit Robin Need to get VoLTE
Onida Onida I4G1 Need to get VoLTE
QiKU QiKU Q Terra Need to get VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia Z2 Tablet Need to get VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia Z3 Need to get VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia Z3 Compact Need to get VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia Z4 Need to get VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet Need to get VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia A4 Need to get VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia M4 Aqua Dual Need to get VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia SP Need to get VoLTE
Sony Sony Xperia Z2 Need to get VoLTE
Vivo Vivo Y21L Need to get VoLTE
Zopo Speed 8 Need to get VoLTE
ZTE ZTE Blade S6 Need to get VoLTE
ZTE ZTE Blade S6 Plus Need to get VoLTE

Jio’s own LYF handsets-

BRAND PHONES VOLTE VOWIFI
LYF Earth 1 Yes Yes
LYF Earth 2 Yes Yes
LYF Wind 1 Yes Yes
LYF Wind 2 Yes Yes
LYF Wind 3 Yes Yes
LYF Wind 4 Yes Yes
LYF Wind 5 Yes Yes
LYF Wind 6 Yes Yes
LYF Wind 7 Yes Yes
LYF Flame 1 Yes Yes
LYF Flame 2 Yes Yes
LYF Flame 3 Yes Yes
LYF Flame 4 Yes Yes
LYF Flame 5 Yes Yes
LYF Flame 6 Yes Yes
LYF Flame 7 Yes Yes
LYF Flame 8 Yes Yes
LYF Water 1 Yes Yes
LYF Water 2 Yes Yes
LYF Water 4 Yes Yes
LYF Water 5 Yes Yes
LYF Water 6 Yes Yes
LYF Water 7 Yes Yes
LYF Water 8 Yes Yes
LYF Water 10 Yes Yes
LYF Water 11 Yes Yes

 

4G mobile is missing from Jio VoLTE support list !

No problem, You can either contact mobile vendor via Chat or Mail-Support or keep eyes on this page for further details on VoLTE supported phones

List of 4g supported phone without VoLTE

Phones added below support 4g without VoLTE feature. VoLTE is missing for now or may be added later via OTA update – You can use JioJoin app to make HD calls & SMS.

Brand Models
Acer  Liquide Z530, Liquid Jade 2, Liquid Jade Primo
Alcatel  Pride T500L, POP 4+, Pop star
Asus  ZenFone 2 Laser ZE550KL, Zenfone 2 ZE551ML (16 gb), Zenfone 2 ZE550ML, Zenfone 2 Laser ZE601KL, Zenfone 2 Laser 5.0 ZE500KL, Zenfone Max (ZC550KL), Zenfone Selfie,Zenfone Zoom
Blackberry  Classic Q20, Leap, Passport, Porsche P9982, Porsche P9983, Dtek 50
Benq T3
BLU Life Mark, Life Mark
CoolPad  Note 3 Lite, Note 3 (8676i02), Note 3 Plus
Elephone P7000, S2 Plus
Gionee  CTRL V6L LTE, Elife S7, Elife E8, F103, Marathon M4, Marathon M5, Marathon M5 Plus, M5 Plus, S Plus, S8, P5L, Elife S6, F105, P7 Max, S6pro
HTC  Desire 820, Desire 626, Desire Eye,Desire 820S Dual Sim,Desire 828 DS, Desire 820Q,Desire 626 dual  Sim, One M8 Eye, One M8, One A9, One M9 Plus, One E9+ Dual Sim, One ME Dual Sim
Huawei  Honor 4x, Honor 5x, Honor 6, Nexus 6P(32 GB), Nexus 6P(64GB), Honor 6 Plus, Honor 7, Honor 7i, Mate 8, Nexus 6P(32 GB), Nexus 6P(64GB), P8, P9
iBerry  Auxus Stunner, Auxus Prime P8000
iBall Cobalt 5.5F Youva, Cobalt Solus 4G
Infocus  M425, M430, M530, M680, M808I, M812I, M460, M810
Intex  Aqua 4G+, Aqua 4G Star, Aqua Turbo 4G, Aqua Ace, Aqua Ace Mini, Aqua GenX, Aqua Super, Aqua Trend, Cloud Flash, Cloud Swift, Cloud 4G Star, Cloud 4G Smart
Itel IT1411, IT1512, it1520, SelfiePro it1511
Lava  Pixel V2, V5, A76, Iris X10, Ivory s 4G, Pixel V2, V2(3gb), V2S
Lenovo  A2010, A76, A6000, A6000 Shot, A6010, A6000 Plus, A6010, A7000, A7000 Turbo, K3 Note,K3 Note Music,  K4 Note, K5 Note, Phab Plus, S90, Vibe P1m, Vibe S1, Vive X2, Vibe X3,  Vibe P1,
Meizu M3 Note
Micromax  Canvas Nitro 3 4G, Canvas Blaze 4g, Canvas Fire 4G, Canvas Knight 2 4G, Canvas 5, Canvas Blaze 4G Plus, Canvas Pace 4G, Canvas Fire 4G+, Canvas Xpress 4G, Canvas Mega 4G, Pulse 4G, Juice 4G, Yu Yutopia, Yu Note,  Yu Yureka 3, Yu Yureka S, Bolt Ninja 4G(Q4201), Bolt Selfie (Q424), Bolt Supreme 6 (Q409), Canvas 5 lite special edition( Q463 ), Canvas Evok (E483)
Microsoft  Lumia 640 Dual, Lumia 640 XL LTE Dual, Lumia 950 Xl Dual
Motorola  Moto X 2nd, Moto G 3rd, Moto X Force, Moto Turbo
OnePlus  OnePlus One, OnePlus 2, OnePlus X
OPPO  X, Neo7, R7 Lite, R7 Plus, R5, N3, R5S
Pepsi P1
Phicomm Energy 653
Panasonic  Eluga Icon, Eluga I2, Eluga L2, T45, Mark, Switch, Eluga Turbo, Eluga Arc, Aluga Icon 2, Eluga I3
Qiku N4
Samsung   Galaxy J1 4G, Grand Prime 4G, Galaxy S5 Plus
Sony  Xperia M4 Dual, Xperia C4 Dual, Xperia C5 Ultra, Xperia  Z3, Xperia  M5, Xperia M5 Dual, Xperia  Z3 Plus, Xperia Z1 Compact, Xperia Z3 Compact, Xperia  Z5, Xperia  Z5 Compact, E4G Dual
Swipe  Elite 2, Elite Note, Elite Plus
TCL  Pride T500L, P561U(fit 5.5)
TP-Link Neffos C5 Max (TP702B), Neffos C5L(TP601B)
Vivo  V1, V27L, V1 Max, X5 Pro, X5 Max, V51L, X33, Y51
Wibridge BLEU WI 208
Wickedleak Wammy Note 5
Wor(l)d Space Phone 5GS
Xiaomi  Redmi 2 Prime, Redmi 2 8GB, Mi4i, Redmi Note 4G, Redmi Note Prime, Mi 4C, Redmi Note 2
XOLO  X11, Era 4G, Blade Q Lux 4G
Zopo Speed 8
ZTE Grand X Max Plus, Nubia Z7 Mini

Note: If you don’t get OTA update for now please use JioJoin app to experience same benefits. please note that Jio Welcome Offer is available only to selected 4G Volte phone

 

 

Apple iPhone 5 vs iPhone 5C vs iPhone 5S: The Key Differentiators

Apple iPhone 5 vs iPhone 5C vs iPhone 5S: The Key Differentiators

 

Apple iPhone 5 vs iPhone 5C vs iPhone 5S: The Key Differentiators

After every iPhone launch, the new handset gets compared to its predecessor. However, this time around this has become a three way comparison since the company has unveiled a couple of iPhones at the same event. Now before throwing numbers and jargons, let me tell you that the iPhone 5C is a plasticky version of the original iPhone 5. From screen to processor, the innards are almost the same. The most significant difference is that the 5C is thicker, heavier, and less classy than the iPhone 5. On the other hand, the iPhone 5S looks almost identical to its predecessor, but packs in quite a few unique features. Apart from the faster chip and improved camera, the Touch ID feature is noteworthy. On the software front, the latest iPhones will ship with iOS 7. But since the iPhone 5 will also receive the latest version of the OS in coming weeks, it’s certainly not a differentiator.
So here’s what’s same and different in these three members of the iPhone family:

Screen
iPhone 5 – 4″ IPS screen with 640×1136 pixels, Scratch resistant.
iPhone 5C – 4″ IPS screen with 640×1136 pixels.
iPhone 5S – 4″ IPS screen with 640×1136 pixels, Scratch resistant.

Yes, the iPhone 5C is probably the only Rs 35,000+ phone to lack the scratch resistant layer.

Construction
iPhone 5 – Aluminium body.
iPhone 5C – Colourful polycarbonate.
iPhone 5S – Aluminium body.

While I love colours, the 5C seems like an iPhone trapped in a Lumia’s body. On the other hand, the iPhone 5 and 5S win you over with their elegance.


Processor
iPhone 5 – A6 chipset clocked at 1.3 GHz (dual-core).
iPhone 5C – A6 chipset clocked at 1.3 GHz (dual-core).
iPhone 5S – A7 chipset clocked at 1.7 GHz (dual-core).

According to Apple, the A7 chipset is twice as fast when compared to the A6. The A7 also has a companion processor, the M7, which is designed to free the primary processor from computing the motion data (coming from accelerometer, gyro, and compass).

Camera
iPhone 5 – 8 megapixel camera with LED flash, ƒ/2.4 aperture.
iPhone 5C – 8 megapixel camera with LED flash, ƒ/2.4 aperture.
iPhone 5S – 8 megapixel camera with dial-LED flash, ƒ/2.2 aperture.

The iPhone 5S sports a 15% larger camera sensor compared to its predecessor. Throw in an aperture of ƒ/2.2 in the mix, and you get a camera that should do better in low-light photography.

Battery
iPhone 5 – 1440 mAh Li-polymer.
iPhone 5C – 1510 mAh Li-polymer.
iPhone 5S – 1570 mAh Li-polymer.

The iPhone 5 had a marathon battery. And since the battery capacity has been slightly increased in the recently announced iPhones, expect it to get even better.
Battery details sourced from GSMArena.com

Unlock Method
iPhone 5 – Password.
iPhone 5C – Password.
iPhone 5S –  Touch ID.

Thanks to the fingerprint identity sensor, you can unlock your iPhone 5S by placing your thumb on the Home button. This feature is missing in the iPhone 5 and 5C.

For more details check out the comparison table below:

 

 

 

 

 

Source: techtree

How it Works? Systems on a Chip (SoC)

Systems on a Chip (SoC):

 

When buying smartphones and tablets, we often talk about their processing power, and make a big fuss of their speed, and whether they can offer single-, dual-, or multiple-core capabilities. And while we do focus on the processor most of the time, you’ll have to know that things aren’t as simple as that. Instead of just simple processors, we have Systems on a Chip (SoC) inside these devices that offer more complex functionality.

What is a System on a Chip?

Since smartphones and tablets are basically smaller computers, they require pretty much the same components we see in desktops and laptops in order to offer us all the amazing things they can do (apps, music and video playing, 3D gaming support, advanced wireless features, etc).

But smartphones and tablets do not offer the same amount of internal space as desktops and laptops for the various components needed such as the logic board, the processor, the RAM, the graphics card, and others. That means these internal parts need to be as small as possible, so that device manufacturers can use the remaining space to fit the device with a long-lasting battery life.

Thanks to the wonders of miniaturization, SoC manufacturers, like Qualcomm, Nvidia or Texas Instruments, can place some of those components on a single chip, the System on a Chip that powers your beloved smartphone.

What’s inside of a SoC?

Now that we know what a SoC is, let’s take a quick look at the components that can be found inside it. Mind you, not all the following parts are built in all the different SoCs that we’re going to show you later on, but in order to better understand how a SoC works, you should have a general picture of what goes inside it:

  • CPU – the central processing unit, whether it’s single- or multiple-core, this is what makes everything possible on your smartphone. Most processors found inside the SoCs that we’re going to look at will be based on ARM technology, but more on that later
  • Memory – just like in a computer, memory is required to perform the various tasks smartphone and tablets are capable of, and therefore SoCs come with various memory architectures on board
  • GPU – the graphic processing unit is also an important component on the SoC, and it’s responsible for handling those complex 3D games on the smartphone or tablets. As you can expect, there are various GPU architectures available out there, and we’re going to further detail them in what follows
  • Northbridge – this is a component that handles communications between the CPU and other components of the SoC including the southbridge
  • Southbrige – a second chipset usually found on computers that handles various I/O functions. In some cases the southbridge can be found on the SoC
  • Cellular radios – some SoCs also come with certain modems on board that are needed by mobile operators. Such is the case with the Snapdragon S4 from Qualcomm, which has an embedded LTE modem on board responsible for 4G LTE connectivity
  • Other radios – some SoCs may also have other components responsible for other types of connectivity, including Wi-Fi, GPS/GLONASS or Bluetooth. Again, the S4 is a good example in this regard.
  • Other circuitry

ARM vs x86 CPU Architecture

Throughout this article you will see us mention the ARM technology more than once, since the SoCs used by current Android smartphones and tablets are built using this ARM architecture. So what is ARM exactly? MaximumPC shares some details regarding the early days of ARM:

In the beginning, the ARM architecture was specifically developed for use in a PC—the Acorn Archimedes to be precise. In 1987, the Archimedes hit the market, powered by the ARM2 processor with up to 4MB of RAM and a 20MB hard drive. With only 30,000 transistors (less than half of the Motorola 68000’s 68,000), the ARM2 was one of the simplest 32-bit processors of its time. This lower transistor count, paired with the efficient reduced instruction set computer (RISC) architecture, allowed ARM2 to outperform Intel’s 80286 while consuming less electricity.

What’s important to remember is that ARM is still the preferred choice by SoC manufacturers, as the architecture ensures high performance at low power, which is what customers are unconsciously interested in.

The Intel 8086 CPU launched in 1978 was a 16-bit microprocessor that was followed by several successors whose names also ended in “86.” Thus, the x86 term was coined. Today the x86 architecture also includes 32-bit CPUs, which can be found in various computers that you may be using on a daily basis. The disadvantage of x86 architecture in mobile SoC is that they’re not as power efficient as ARM-based CPU. Only Intel currently develops an x86-based SoC for mobile devices, the Atom Medfield platform.

GPU architectures

The SoCs that we’re going to describe below use various GPU technologies coming from various companies. You’ll see GeForce, Adreno, ARM Mali, or PowerVR get mentioned a few times so here’s what these names mean:

  • GeForce – produced by NVIDIA, these are the ultra low power graphics cards found on Tegra 3 SoC
  • Adreno – produced by Qualcomm, the Adreno GPUs are part of the Snapdragon SoC made by the same company. Some Adreno GPUs can also be used on future Microsoft Windows 8 devices.
  • ARM Mali – as you may have guessed, Mali GPUs are designed by ARM and they’re currently used on various SoC designs including Exynos and NovaThor
  • PowerVR – PowerVR is a leading GPU designers, whose GPUs are found on various SoCs including Medfield, NovaThor (future designs), OMAP, and even Apple Ax.

SoC varieties

There are various SoCs out there, from different manufacturers that equip Android devices, from smartphones to tablets, but they’re not completely similar. Let’s take a look at some of the most important ones for you.

NVIDIA Tegra 3

Also known as Kal-El, the NVIDIA Tegra 3 series is one of the SoC sub-families of the Tegra family and it’s currently employed by various Android devices, including, but not limited to, the Asus Eee Pad Transformer Pad, HTC One X (international version), the Asus Transformer Pad 300, the LG Optimus 4X HD and others. The rumored Google Nexus tablet will also reportedly come with a Tegra 3 SoC on board.

 

Tegra 3 comes with a quad-core CPU, but what’s interesting about it is that it actually has five cores. The design is meant to optimize power consumption in various device activity states and extend battery life. Each core is a Cortex A9 ARM chip, but the fifth one, which is made of a special low power silicon process, is limited to an optimal speed of 500MHz. This is because it will handle only certain tasks, and only in certain situations. The companion core will be used by the device when in standby mode or when dealing with certain tasks that don’t require faster processing. When the device is switched on (or better said in use), the other cores come to life and users can enjoy a great smartphone and tablet experience, with great graphics and processing speed.

In addition to the CPU, the Tegra 3 SoC also contains the graphics processing unit (GPU), northbrige, southbridge, and memory controller. The SoC supports video output up to 2560 x 1600 resolution and 1080p H.264/MPEG-4 AVC video codec (recording and playing high quality videos).

Qualcomm Snapdragon S4

Qualcomm is another important name when it comes to Android smartphones and tablets (but not only) as the American company is responsible for various families of SoCs used in various generations of smartphones and tablets. Since Snapdragon S4 is the Qualcomm SoC used by some of the most recent devices out there, we’re going to focus on it, but you’ll have to know that the S4 was preceded by other SoC generations.

Snapdragon S4 has a processor that’s similar to the ARM Cortex-A15 CPU, but built according to Qualcomm’s own design. In addition to the CPU, the Snapdragon S4 offers HD video recording and playing support and integrated Adreno GPU capabilities. But one of the most interesting things about the S4 is that it also packs a modem with radio capabilities required by smartphones and tablets with cellular circuitry.

Specifically, the S4 packs a 4G LTE modem, which explains why various companies launched their high-end devices with quad-core capabilities in international markets (using various SoC solutions other than the S4), but when it came to the U.S. launch, they replaced them with the S4 to offer 4G LTE support, even though it only packs dual-core processing powers. The S4 also handles Wi-Fi, GPS/GLONASS, and Bluetooth on most devices.

There are various Snapdragon S4 SoC versions, built on both 40nm and 28nm technology (lower is better as it’s more power efficient) and they are used in some Android devices you may have already heard of, including the HTC One S, Asus Transformer Pad Infinity, North-American HTC One X, HTC EVO 4G LTE, Sony Xperia S, North American Samsung Galaxy S3, and others.

Samsung Exynos 4 Quad

As you’d expect, Samsung has its own SoC platform, the Exynos family. Of those SoCs, we’re going to focus on its latest addition, the Exynos 4 Quad, that’s found on the international version of its 2012 flagship smartphone, the Samsung Galaxy S3.

Exynos SoCs are also based on ARM architecture, just like Tegra 3 and Snapdragon S4. The Exynos 4 Quad is built with 32nm High-K Metal Gate (HKMG) process that’s ready to offer “twice better CPU performance” but 20% lower power consumption than the previous model, which was used in the Galaxy S II. Exynos 4 Quad packs a 1.4GHZ Quad-core ARM Cortex-A9 CPU and the ARM Mali-400 MP4 quad-core GPU. The processor supports 3D gaming, fast multitasking and HD video recording and playback. The Exynos 4 Quad is used in the Galaxy S3 (international version) and in the Meizu MX Quad.

Previous Exynos generations can be found in the Galaxy S2, Galaxy Note, Galaxy Tab 7.7, Galaxy Tab 7.0 Plus, Galaxy S, Droid Charge, Exibit 4G, Infuse 4G, but also in non-Samsung devices such as the Meizu MX and Meizu M9.

Intel Medfield

While you’re likely to find various Intel processors in all sorts of desktops, laptops and notebooks, the company has not really made a play for the mobile business until earlier this year. Intel announced at CES 2012 that it plans to attack the smartphone and tablet mobile business with its own SoC platform, codenamed Medfield, which should be found inside various mobile devices in the future.

So far, we have three such devices announced, the Orange San Diego (Santa Clara) theLenovo K800, and the Lava Xolo X900. Intel announced a partnership with Motorola (owned by Google) and we’re certainly curious to see the first Googlerola devices to come with Intel circuitry on board.

Medfield SoCs are built with 32nm HKMG technology, just like the Exynos Quad 4 Core but it’s not based on ARM architecture. Instead, Intel is relying on its own x86 technology to make these SoCs. Medfield SoCs can offer OEMs a 1.6-2GHz single-core processor and PowerVR’s SGX540 GPU.

Texas Instruments OMAP 4

While they’re not as popular as Qualcomm or NVIDIA SoCs, the OMAP family from Texas Instruments should definitely be taken very seriously. In case OMAP sounds familiar, that’s because we’ve seen such SoCs equip various Android devices in the past, including the original Motorola Droid that spawned the Android revolution, the Barnes & Noble Nook Color and Nook Simple, the Motorola Bravo, the Motorola Defy, the LG Optimus Black, the Motorola Droid 2, the Samsung Galaxy S LCD, but also non-Android devices like the Palm Pre and Pre 2 or the Nokia N9.

The latest TI OMAP SoCs family is the fourth-generation OMAPs, or OMAP 4, which relies on a dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 45nm-based architecture. There are various OMAP4 SoCs, but all of them will offer PowerVR graphics. The OMAP 4 4470 model stands out because, in addition to the dual-core CPU, it has two companion Cortex-M3 cores that are supposed to take over smaller tasks to increase power efficiency, just like the fifth core found on the Tegra 3. The 4470 model also comes with 1080p full HD video recording and playback support.

Here are some Android devices that pack TI OMAP 4 SoCs: Motorola Atrix 2, Motorola Droid 3, Motorola Droid Bionic, Motorola Droid RAZR, Motorola Xyboard, some Samsung Galaxy S2 models, Amazon Kindle Fire, Barnes & Noble Nook Tablet, Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 7.0, Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 10.1, Samsung Galaxy Nexus, LG Optimus 3D and LG Optimus Max. But an OMAP 4 SoC can also be found on the BlackBerry PlayBook for example.

ST-Ericsson NovaThor

The NovaThor SoC platform developed by ST-Ericsson is not that known in the mobile business, although we already have certain devices that rely on this SoC including the Sony Xperia P, Sony Xperia U, Sony Xperia Sola, Samsung Galaxy Ace 2, Samsung Galaxy Beam and the HTC Sensation for China. The NovaThor SoCs used so far come with 1GHz or 1.2GHz dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 processors, single core ARM Mali 400 GPUs, and wireless support (GSM/EDGE/HSPA/HSPA+, depending on the model used.) Current NovaThor SoCs are built on 45nm process technology, although ST-Ericsson plans to launch more power-efficient models that will come with 32nm/28 semiconductor technology and that will feature faster CPU speeds, Power VR graphics and even LTE support.

Other SoCs

We couldn’t talk about Systems on a Chip without mentioning what the competition is using. Apple has its proprietary line of AX chips (A4, A5 and A5X), which have been used on all of its iOS devices starting with the original iPad. The flagship Apple SoC is the A5X, which currently equips the new iPad, but Apple is rumored to be working on a new model, the A6, that’s going to be found on board of future iOS devices.

Which one is best for me?

The obvious question you may have is, which of the SoCs above is best for me? .

In case you’re buying one of the last-gen Android tablets and smartphones available out there, which will surely pack one of the SoCs mentioned above, then you’re likely to get a similar performance across the board. Sure, every SoC manufacturer will defend its own brand with words like “power efficiency,” “high performance,” “3D graphics,” “full HD video,” but all these competing platforms will offer overall enjoyable user experiences with few differences between them. The fact remains that you shouldn’t buy a new device after looking only at SoC capabilities, but you should consider more factors like display technology, wireless connectivity, camera performance, and storage, in order to make a more informed purchase.

One such example is the American Galaxy S3 which packs a dual-core processor, part of the Snapdragon S4 SoC, instead of the quad-core processor that’s found on the Exynos 4 Quad SoC. This is because the American Galaxy S3 is supposed to offer LTE support, and it’s the S4 SoC that happens to have an LTE modem included, not the Exynos 4 Quad. So while some Galaxy S3 buyers will complain about not getting the full quad-core power promised by the international Galaxy S3 version, they still get that precious LTE support, in a (hopefully) power-efficient manner.

In case you want to buy a new/second-hand older Android device, then you should pay attention to its SoC and its capabilities, and check out performance comparisons (benchmark tests) to see how your chosen device fares against other devices.

And let’s not forget that all companies mentioned above are already working on next-gen SoCs, and we can’t wait to see what next year’s smartphones and tablets will be able to do thanks to new internal components and improved operating systems.

Understanding Ultrabooks

In fact, Intel expects ultrabooks to occupy around 40% of the total laptops launched in 2012. We conversed with Karen Regis, Intel’s Director of Ultrabook Marketing Strategy, to get insights about the big picture.

Following excerpts from our interview:

1) Laptops vs netbooks vs ultrabooks — what’s the difference between them?

There are many types of mobile devices for consumers these days, and it’s important for buyers to understand the differences between them to make sure they choose the right device for their needs. Netbooks are great for content consumption and light productivity and offer the most affordable price points. Ultrabooks are for users looking for a full PC experience in an ultra sleek, ultra stylish design. They have the horsepower for just about any productivity task, but also provide great battery life, the ability to wake up in a flash and built-in security – all at mainstream system price points.

2) In many ways, the netbook segment was a much bigger breakthrough (from a technical perspective) than all the hype surrounding ultrabooks, which is just natural evolution of laptops. Would you agree that the term ultrabook is a marketing gimmick?

Intel expects Ultrabook devices to be as transformational to mobile computing as Intel Centrino Mobile technology was more than eight years ago. Remember, Intel’s vision for the Ultrabook entails a multi-year, industry-wide endeavor that will roll out in phases with new experiences and features added over time. It’s about driving innovation and integrating capabilities that users want and may not even know yet that they need – much like Centrino helped make Wi-Fi a must-have in laptops. Some of the nearer term innovations we expect to see include hybrid devices (both tablet and laptop functionality) as well as technologies like touch and sensors. Intel is committed to the Ultrabook category, and we’re seeing very strong support from our partners as well.

3) This is the first time since 2003 and Centrino chips that Intel is promoting a product such aggressively in the market. Why are ultrabooks so important? How do they feature in Intel’s roadmap?

Yes, on April 4, we announced our new Ultrabook marketing campaign, Intel’s largest in nearly a decade. The global campaign theme is how Intel-inspired Ultrabooks are ushering in “a new era of computing” – making everything else seem like ancient history/old fashioned compared to an Ultrabook.

The creation of the Ultrabook category was shaped by extensive user research and reflects what users value most in a mobile device – a no-compromise, most complete, satisfying and more secure computing experience. We are very excited about this category and are looking ahead to our Ivy Bridge and Haswell platforms to continue to evolve and bring new capabilities to Ultrabook devices in the next several years.

4) How do you respond to the criticism that the ultrabook is a desperate attempt to rekindle excitement among laptops, more importantly among consumers more keen on buying a tablet?

Worldwide PC unit shipments continue to grow at double-digit rates. This is one of the reasons for Intel’s recent record revenues and earnings. We believe that PCs will continue to play a key role in people’s personal computing needs.

At the same time, people have rapidly evolving requirements for personal computing in terms of responsiveness, capabilities, increased security and mobility. Intel aims to help drive these changes. Whether it’s a tablet, PC, Ultrabook or hybrids we aim to deliver great experiences that satisfy people’s needs, no matter what the device.

5) Is an ultrabook a poor man’s MacBook Air?

Intel’s vision for Ultrabook devices entails a multi-year, industry-wide endeavor that will roll out in phases where new experiences and features will be added over time. Intel aims with the Ultrabook category to deliver new experiences that people want and will love. Devices coming in the future will blend the best of the laptop experience with aspects of other consumer electronic devices.

7) We’ve tested majority of the ultrabooks so far and they all offer close to 5 hours of battery life on a single charge. How has Intel managed to do this — make thin ultrabooks last longer than fatter laptops with bigger and better batteries?

Great battery life is one of the requirements to be called an Ultrabook. Ultrabook devices offer at least 5 hours of battery life with many providing 8 hours or more, even in the sleekest form factors. In general, we expect to see greater use of Lithium polymer batteries (such as are used in phones) in Ultrabook devices. Intel is focused on driving innovations in battery design and technology in the industry to continually improve the user experience in terms of ever better battery life in ever more attractive designs. This is one of the focus areas of the Ultrabook Fund (read more here).

8) Regarding OEMs and various partners, is Intel laying down minimum specifications for ultrabooks to ensure a standard benchmark for end user experience?

Intel works closely with its industry partners to ensure that Ultrabook devices consistently deliver a compelling and unique value proposition to customers. In order for a system to be classified as an Ultrabook and use the Ultrabook trademark, a certain set of guidelines must be followed. The guidelines may evolve over time as new capabilities come to market. A verification process is in place to help ensure the consistent and outstanding experience we aim to deliver.

9) What are some of the main challenges that may hinder ultrabooks from completely dominating the personal computing market?

We’re thrilled with the reception to Ultrabook devices so far. There’s already been a lot of enthusiasm around the category. We believe there will continue to be a spectrum of types of products with different capabilities and features that meet consumers’ varying needs. There will always be users, though, who are looking for companion devices, like a netbook, to complement their Ultrabook or laptop. There are also those who value certain features more. For example, a gamer may want a desktop system with maximum performance. Or a road warrior may value weight and size as the top feature. We value choice and a spectrum of options for all types of users.

10) This year marks Intel’s first steps into the tablet and smartphone market with Medfield chips. How important is this market to Intel and how does it affect sales of ultrabooks?

I’m not the right person to comment on Medfield, but what I can tell you is that whether it’s a tablet, PC, phone or Ultrabook Intel aims to deliver great experiences that satisfy people’s needs, no matter what the device.

12) How committed is Intel to the future of ultrabooks beyond the upcoming Ivy Bridge architecture?

Intel’s vision for Ultrabook devices entails a multi-year, industry-wide endeavor that will roll out in phases where new experiences and features will be added over time:

A) Intel’s latest Ultra-Low Voltage 2nd generation Intel Core processors started the transition to Ultrabook systems by enabling a new class of thin, light, beautiful designs with mainstream price points. Many systems are available today.

B) 3rd generation Intel Core processors (codenamed “Ivy Bridge”), Intel’s next generation chip, is scheduled for availability very soon. Ultrabook systems based on this new family of processors will bring improved power efficiency, smart visual performance, increased responsiveness and enhanced security. Complimentary USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt technologies are also part of Intel’s ongoing work to drive the PC platform forward.

C) “Haswell” is the third step toward accelerating the category of Ultrabook devices. With “Haswell,” Intel will change the mainstream laptop thermal design point by reducing microprocessor power to 10-20 watts – half of today’s design point.

All answers attributed to Karen Regis, Intel’s Director of Ultrabook Marketing Strategy.

Thanks to : Thinkdigit

Android Phone Vs Windows Phone Vs i-Phone

Android Phone Vs Windows Phone Vs i-Phone

 

Smooth Experience And Fresh Design
Windows Phone comes with a design that has been made from scratch, called the Metro UI. This fresh new interface consists of tiles, rather than the icon-based design that has been, dare we may say, copied by everyone from the iPhone. The tiles are “live”, meaning that they actually show the updated status of the applications they are meant for. The animation effects are also different, and the overall user experience is very smooth. Part of the reason for this is that Microsoft has put stringent hardware requirements for devices to qualify for this platform, which effectively protects against fragmentation that has been experienced by other mobile platforms such as Android.

Deep Social Networking Integration And Web Browsing
TechTree Blog: 5 Reasons Why Windows Phone Will SucceedOne of the first things that you will notice when you start using a WP smartphone is the amount of social network integration that has been built into this platform. You can log into FacebookTwitterWindows LiveLinkedIn, and a host of other social networks and get instant status updates on the home screen through the People tile. The phone’s contact list automatically gets populated with your friends’ details, from the networks you have signed into. In addition to the above, users can also sign into email services of their choice and contacts saved over there are also downloaded automatically to the device, while a live tile for the mail service is made available on the home screen for quick and easy access. Last but not the least, we have to mention that WP devices provide one of the fastest and smoothest internet browsing experience in the current crop of mobile phones, and the credit for this goes to its Internet Explorer browser that uses the same core and rendering engine as IE9 for desktop.

An Increasingly Attractive Application Store
TechTree Blog: 5 Reasons Why Windows Phone Will SucceedSmartphones these days are not just about making phone calls, as more and more users want to use applications for different tasks and the success of a platform depends on its app ecosystem. WP has its own Marketplace application store that distributes free and paid apps. The number of apps is nowhere near that of competing stores, but it is definitely increasing, with the current number now standing at over 80,000. The quality of apps is generally good and Microsoft exercises a strict policy of not allowing “socially unacceptable” programs, possibly with the aim to protect young users against the “evils of the online world”. One of the good things about this app store is that even if it is a paid app, you can still download and try it out before deciding if you would want to buy.

Microsoft Applications Integration
TechTree Blog: 5 Reasons Why Windows Phone Will SucceedWP devices come with integrated Microsoft applications. The Xbox Live tile grants users access to some Xbox 360 features via the “Games hub”. Users can log into the phone using the same credentials as that for the console and purchase games, set their avatar in a 3D fashion, and also play several multiplayer games right from their handset, even as they are on the move. WP phones also come with free Microsoft Office Mobile to let you open, create, or edit MS Office documents including WordExcelPowerPoint,OneNote, and SharePoint. Files can be saved either locally or to SkyDrive and Office 365so that they can be accessed later through cloud servers.

Timely Updates For OS And Apps
TechTree Blog: 5 Reasons Why Windows Phone Will SucceedMicrosoft seems to have taken cue from the negative feedback for its previous mobile OS and made sure that WP devices receive timely updates for the OS as well as for the apps thus far. Updating has been made very easy with the possibility of downloading and installing OTA (over the air) or by connecting the phone to a computer. Similar to the updates for its desktop OS, these WP updates iron out bugs and plug holes in an effort to deliver a better user experience.

Windows Phone smartphones are still awaiting widespread adoption, but we think that its popularity will increase if Microsoft continues to make sure that it does not waver from the above advantages that are currently offered by this platform.

There are certain perks to working as a tech journalist: coffee is free and plentiful, trade shows are equal parts fun and frantic, and most of all, we get the chance to play with lots and lots of new toys. I’ve personally had the luck to be able to swap handsets pretty much bi-weekly for the last couple of months, and find it kind of a bummer that Windows Phone 7 hasn’t really been embraced as the solid mobile platform that it is (I said it’s a bummer, I didn’t say we didn’t see it coming).

Regardless of the numbers, WP7 is one of our favorite mobile platforms, outshining Android in almost every aspect. Don’t believe me? Well, allow me to try and change your mind.

Streamlined User Interface

Android’s are different depending on the SKU of the handset. In other words, the UI you’ll be dealing with when using, say, a Motorola handset, will be radically different than one from Samsung or HTC. The ambiguity can be disconcerting. With WP7, you know what kind of interface you’re going to be working with, regardless of the handset manufacturer. We’d imagine that an un-tweaked user interface would also make lives easier for developers, as well. We love some Android user interfaces, but loathe others. With WP7, at least you know what user interface to expect, regardless of the handset maker. Speaking of which…

WP7 Has An Easier-To-Use Interface

It really does. And look, we get it. An Android is a power user’s phone, and we know that if you’re really looking for power-use, you’ve got to be willing to learn some things. But we’re the geeky minority here, and you’ve got to keep in mind that most people are looking for a phone that makes it easiest to do their day-to-day tasks. Keeping that in mind, WP7’s “tile” system is simply easier to organize and find the things you need to throughout the day. It looks cooler too; way cooler, actually.

WP7 Has Apps That Aren’t Crap

Open-source is good, and it’s a compelling reason to support Android as a mobile platform, but let’s face it: You’ve got to sift through some real $#@t in the Android Marketplace to find apps that are worth downloading, much less buying. Most people fail to realize that the Windows Mobile SDK has been around for quite some time now, and it shows in the Marketplace, especially on the gaming side of the spectrum. Many of the games we played featured awesome 3D graphics and a level of polish simply not(yet)-to-be-found in the Android hemisphere. Microsoft has a far stricter criteria set than Google about which apps and games can populate their respective marketplace. Oh, and now that we’re on the topic of gaming…

Microsoft LIVE Integration Is Bad Ass

If you’re achievement junkies like we are (you know who you are), then a WP7 handset is a must-have. Have a game on Xbox or PC that you love playing? Pop over to the Windows app store; chances are there’s a mobile version of that same game, where you can continue earning points and unlocking achievements with your handset. You can also keep tabs on your buddies’ achievements, and tweak and enhance your Xbox Live avatar. Granted, this integration is still in an infancy stage, but we’d be willing to bet that we’ll be seeing deeper and more intuitive connections between gaming and phones in the near-future. Forward progress is good progress.

Microsoft Mobile Office Integration

We were actually blown away by how deep this rabbit-hole goes. Microsoft Word Mobile Edition, by way of an example, is actually a very intuitive little program, allowing you remote access documents using SharePoint Server 2010, you can use the “find” tool to look for particular words or phrases, and you can even email documents directly from the program.

We’ve had the pleasure of testing some Android phones that can dock with workstations to function as a laptop; imagine how crazy it would be if Windows launched a similar product with a full-fledged Office Suite. That’d be one step closer to a true fusion between phones and computers, and we’re all for that.

Microsoft Isn’t Constantly Getting Sued by Apple

Whether targeting HTC a year ago or Motorola last fall or even Samsung (which is remarkable seeing how they are a flat out key supplier of Apple’s hardware components) just a few days ago, Apple has been regularly suing the hell out of Android handset makers; mostly in regards to hardware and software patents. So why is Apple seemingly ignoring WP7 in the courts? Well, there could be numerous reasons: Optimistically, it could be because the software and hardware developments on WP7 are truly original and innovative, meaning Apple can’t accuse Microsoft of lifting their ideas. A more realistic reasoning? Apple doesn’t see WP7 as that big of a threat…yet.

Stability

This is speaking from personal experience with various handsets across both platforms, but to put it simply, WP7 has just been a more stable experience. Apps like Facebook and Netflix simply run the way they were meant to with far less of the hiccups and crashes found on the Android platform. This runs parallel with the overall theme behind WP7 mobile devices: Simplicity. Granted, WP7 had to forgo some of the more complex actions Androids are capable of (i.e. lack of tethering support, lack of ability to capture screenshots, no multi-tasking), but to us, that’s a worthy trade for a phone that will do what you want it do, every step of the way.

Zune is a Native Client, and it’s Not Pay-Per-Song

We like Zune as a service—you pay a monthly fee and can download as many songs as you want, as opposed to being pigeonholed into paying per song, like with Apple and Android. Also, we really enjoy the fact that Zune is a native client that comes fresh out-the-box with WP7—setting up music services on an Android involves downloading various apps (like Google Music, which then has to synch to your Google Wallet, which then has to synch to your Google Music Server, which then needs a Gauntlet from Moredore to unlock your songs, which then needs…well, you get the point) that is just sort of a hassle, and glitchy to boot. Again, simplicity reigns supreme.

Snappier Keyboard

All right, we’re getting down to the nitty-gritty, and this is a minor nit to pick, but for the most part (with the exception of the Android Sprint Galaxy, which actually featured a physical slide-out QWERTY keyboard), Windows Phone 7 had a snappier, and more importantly, a more consistent keyboard that was snappy and accurate, regardless of the device. And, though Droid offered a few keyboard-contenders with the Galaxy S2 and the Incredible, others were really bad, (ahem, Droid X2, cough).

No Ad-Ware!

That’s right, there is nary a pop up ad to be found, whether you’re in the Windows Marketplace, or playing a game. There is nothing more irritating when using an Android that having to manually close pop-up adds, many of which appear mid game. There are, indeed, advantages to more stringent app restrictions, and WP7 seems to have found a perfect balance.

The Brief Verdict:

So to get you started, here’s a quick primer on iPhone, Android, and Windows Phone (sorry, no BlackBerry considered in the race), and a smattering of the most common questions about smartphone OSes I’ve received from you.

iPhone 4S in a nutshell

  • Runs Apple’s iOS 5 operating system
  • Available on three carriers: AT&T, Verizon, Sprint
  • Available on three storage sizes: 16GB, 32GB, 64GB
  • Easiest compatibility with iTunes, Apple ecosystem, and products
  • Form factor: One 3.5-inch screen (on the smaller size by today’s standards)
  • Interface: Approachable, but not very customizable. Some hidden features
  • Key features: Excellent 8-megapixel camera, front-facing camera, colorful Siri voice assistant
  • Next big release: iPhone 5, release date unknown, but speculated for summer 2012

Android in a nutshell

  • Google’s mobile operating system
  • Form factor: Available on all carriers, all shapes, all sizes
  • All capabilities: Range from budget to super premium
  • Not all Android phones are created equal in capability: some have excellent cameras, screens, etc. Some don’t.
  • Easiest compatibility with Google services, Google Music, other Android devices
  • Interface: Varies by manufacturers, has a small learning curve for some features
  • Key features: Free voice navigation with turn-by-turn directions, very customizable, voice actions
  • Next big phone release: Samsung Galaxy Nexus phone, Verizon release date unknown, but probably December
  • Next big operating system release: Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. Released with Galaxy Nexus, coming to existing handsets starting “early 2012”

Windows Phone in a nutshell

  • Microsoft’s mobile operating system
  • Form factor: Available on all carriers, all shapes, all sizes.
  • AT&T has the largest and best selection
  • All capabilities: Mostly midrange, solid performers. Minimum 5-megapixel camera
  • Easiest compatibility with Zune, Xbox Live, Microsoft services like Microsoft Office, SkyDrive online storage
  • Interface: Very straightforward, but some hidden capabilities
  • Key features: Clean interface, built-in barcode-scanning and music identification, Xbox Live integration, voice actions
  • Next big phone release: Nokia Lumia 800 or similar for U.S. markets, probably January
  • Next big operating system release: Unknown. Version 7.5 Mango released in September

Android FAQ

Question:Why there is delay on update for Android devices, and will Ice Cream Sandwich bring the solution for this problem?
With Android phones, we’re at the mercy of manufacturers and carriers who need to test the new OS with the additional skins, overlays, or additional software these phones might have. My colleague Bonnie Cha wrote a great story explaining how OS updates work. So the answer is no, Ice Cream Sandwich (or ICS) won’t fix this. However, back in May, Google and several key manufacturing partners agreed to work together to bring phones released within 18 months of a new OS updated to the latest OS version. Unfortunately, neither Google nor other manufacturers have been forthcoming with how this is playing out in practice. For now, the surest bet to get the latest Android OS is to get the Galaxy Nexus or Samsung Nexus S phone (available for AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint).

Q: I am looking forward to buying the Galaxy Nexus. However, which phone would you select between it, the Motorola Droid Razr, and the HTC Rezound?
If it’s specs you’re wondering about, check out my former colleague Nicole Lee’s helpful chart comparing the three. If it’s the overall look and feel, well, that’s just a question I can’t answer for you. What do you value most: the camera, the speed, the price, the way it feels in your hand? They’re all fast, they’re all premium, and they all run on Verizon’s phenomenal 4G LTE network.

The Droid Razr and Galaxy Nexus are thin, but the Galaxy Nexus and Rezound have better screens. The Galaxy Nexus has a 5-megapixel camera, but the Droid Razr’s isn’t my absolute favorite on the market, either. The Droid Razr is more stylish. The Rezound comes with Beats by Dr. Dre headphones and a music algorithm, but the Galaxy Nexus is the first to have the powerful Ice Cream Sandwich OS (the other two will get it as well, but you’ll have to wait until early 2012.) Yet, the Galaxy Nexus isn’t even available yet, while the other two are. I recommend getting yourself to a Verizon store and getting your hands on the other two devices to see how much you connect with them, then go from there.

iPhone FAQ

Q: With the iPhone 4S out, would it be better to wait for the iPhone 5? My 2-year contract renewal is up in 2012. I am hearing possibly summer 2012 for iPhone 5.
If you’re still riding out a contract, keep waiting. The iPhone 4S is a great device, but it’s not worth breaking a contract for or buying fresh unless you need Siri or a better camera.

Windows Phone FAQ

Q: Which is easier to use: Windows Phone, iOS 5, or Android 4.0?
Windows Phone has the cleanest OS of the three and is the easiest for getting in and out, at least as far as the main screens go. With only two home screens to toggle between, it’s hard to get lost. However, the edgy “metro” look may not be for everyone, and the apps look completely different. There are also a few tricks you need to know about to fully use the OS, like pressing and holding on “live tiles” to pin, unpin, and get more options, and using your finger to pull down the signal strength meter and battery meter while you’re on the Start screen (these otherwise disappear from view.) There are other tricks, too–tools in Bing you may not think to look for, and actions when you press and hold the Home and Back buttons.

The iPhone and Android have their own quirks as well, and I don’t consider the other two particularly hard to learn, though with its large icons and limit to two screens, it’s easier to navigate Windows Phone.

Do you know if WP7.5 is limited to single-core processors and how that would impact the performance of the devices?
Right now all Windows phones are single-core, and I can’t complain about performance issues. With the way that the OS handles tasks and task-switching, dual-core processing may not be strictly necessary. That said, as all phones join the processor race, I’m sure we’ll eventually see dual-core Windows Phones with much larger screens and many more features advanced as well.

Q: Do you think Windows will have the kind of app choice that iOS or Android do? I have not heard much about what Microsoft is doing to bring in developers or how they will play the app market.
Windows Phone is really ramping up its app presence. In a few months’ time, the population of the app Marketplace has shot from 18,000 to 40,000, and is growing. While they need to keep wooing developers to create interesting apps, there’s also the danger of choking on too much unnecessary app sludge, an argument one could levy against iOS (500+K apps) and even Android (300K).

Battery life

With battery life being one of the biggest issues, does any one of the operating systems seem to handle that better than the others? If so, which and why?
How a phone’s operating system handles resources is part of the equation, but not as key a factor in our opinion as the hardware and the capacity of the battery. If it seems that Android phones experience faster battery draining than the iPhone, that’s likely because there’s so much variance among different hardware specs and manufacturers. To be fair, the recently launched iPhone 4S has purportedly shorter battery life than several Android phones as well. There are also some Android phones with better battery life than others.

The real question is when we can stop wondering if our smartphones will last longer than a day before needing a recharge. Here’s some good news we still have to wait to see: researchers are redesigning the lithium ion battery to charge faster and hold charges longer, up to three days. I, for one, am relieved to know that smart chemists are hard at work, and that a fix is coming.

The secret behind Nokia’s 41-megapixel camera phone

Saying a smartphone has an excellent 5-megapixel camera doesn’t make for good headlines, but that’s what Nokia’s promising with its 41-megapixel 808 PureView. Well, that, and a usable digital zoom.

When Nokia announced the 41-megapixel 808 PureView smartphone at MWC 2012, CNET’s associate editor Lynn La said “it is a phone that has so many megapixels, its megapixels have megapixels.” That, it turns out, was a pretty accurate statement.

But, before I get into what that all means, judging by comments I’ve read there seems to be some confusion about the largeness of the sensor. The 808’s image sensor is not only larger in resolution, but physical size. It’s larger than the ones in most–if not all–current smartphones as well as the majority of point-and-shoots.

Nokia conquers the camera phone with the 808 PureView (photos)

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The 8-megapixel iPhone 4S, for example, has a 1/3.2-inch type sensor while most compact cameras use a 1/2.3-inch type sensor. The 808’s in comparison is a 1/1.2-inch type, which is quite a large sensor for a mobile device. (Do the division and you get the approximate diagonal measurement of the sensor.) That’s 2.5 times larger than the one Nokia used in its 12-megapixel N8.

Of course, packing a larger sensor with more than three times the number of pixels doesn’t translate into better photos: smaller pixels collect less light, which worsens image quality. The thing is, Nokia doesn’t really want you to use the full resolution of its sensor. Not for giant photos, anyway.

Instead, the 808 defaults to a 5-megapixel resolution. Through a process called pixel oversampling (though some might call it pixel binning), Nokia combines seven pixels into one superpixel. Doing that helps eliminate image noise in low-light conditions and, according to Nokia, makes noise virtually nonexistent when shooting in good lighting. So while the 808 can be set to take 38- or 34-megapixel images depending on the aspect ratio used–4:3 or 16:9, respectively–it’s not why Nokia used such a high-resolution sensor.

The pixel oversampling also allowed Nokia to develop a lossless digital zoom, which is probably the most important part for a lot of people. Basically, as you zoom out the amount of oversampling reduces until you’ve reached the limit of the actual resolution. In other words, if you have it set for 5 megapixels you can continue to zoom until it’s no longer oversampling and simply using a 5-megapixel area of the sensor. There is no upscaling or interpolation, it’s just a 5-megapixel photo. At that resolution, it will give you about a 3x lossless zoom for photos and a 4x zoom for movies shot in full HD. Reduce the resolution, and you get more lossless zoom.

For controlling the zoom, Nokia’s added a new slide zoom feature that lets you slide your finger up and down anywhere on the display to smoothly move in and out. And with no moving optics, you won’t hear the zoom while recording.

Speaking of optics, Nokia’s lens choice makes things even more interesting. The Carl Zeiss 5-element lens has one high-index, low-dispersion glass lens instead of being all plastic like other smartphones. It has a large f2.4 aperture with a 26mm focal length for 16:9 and 28mm for 4:3. Nokia claims the combination along with the large sensor size will give you some nice background blur for close-ups; the 808 can focus as close as 6 inches from a subject. (Add in the lossless zoom and you can get very close to what you’re shooting and presumably still get great fine detail.)

Also, with no optical zoom, the camera uses the f2.4 aperture through the range of the zoom. Optical zooms on compact cameras use increasingly smaller apertures as you extend the lens, which means you have to use higher ISO sensitivities and slower shutter speeds to avoid blur. The 808’s f2.4 lens and digital zoom won’t have that issue, so it can keep ISO low for less noise and still use faster shutter speeds.

If you’re interested in more details on all that the sensor, lens, and processing combination of the Nokia 808 PureView has to offer, read Nokia’s white paper on the subject.

Lastly, I’ve seen some mentions that this is comparable to Lytro’s sensor technology, but it’s really not. Lytro’s sensor design is unique, while the 808’s sensor is pretty much a traditional design just with a super-high resolution, which Nokia takes full advantage of to produce better photos.

At least, that’s what Nokia’s saying. We’ll have to wait till we get our hands on one to know for sure.

Why You Can’t Dismiss Nokia’s 41-Megapixel Phone

My first reaction upon hearing about Nokia’s 41-megapixel 808 Pureview was that it was an absurdity, a perfect example of the very worst of consumer electronics, and a total miss. But the more I read, the better I understood that this phone isn’t just some freak of nature with a ridiculously high number attached to it. It’s just the slightly awkward first steps of a serious move by Nokia to differentiate itself.

If you’ve only skimmed the news, there are some things you should probably know about this strange beast of a camera.

First, the 41 megapixel figure is really misrepresentative, not to say untrue. It doesn’t take 41-megapixel photos in any way, shape, or form. Even in the special high-res creative mode, it “only” produces 38 megapixels. Mostly it will be taking normal-size shots, between 3 and 8 megapixels. So what the hell does this 41 megapixel figure even mean?

It means Nokia is being smart about the way cameras at this size actually work. I wrote a while back about how HD does not always mean high definition, and cameraphones were an excellent example of this. Their tiny sensors and bad lenses meant that while they may produce pictures of a certain size, the quality was sorely lacking. This was because they insisted on wringing every possible pixel out of an incredibly small sensor.

The 808′s sensor (supposedly manufactured by Toshiba) is not small. At 1/1.2″, it’s four or five times the size of most cameraphone sensors, including the one in the iPhone 4S. Bigger in fact than the sensors in most point-and-shoots. Now, when you make your sensor bigger, you can either keep the same resolution but have bigger wells or photosites (which detect light and make up pixels), which usually improves sensitivity. Or you can keep the same photosite size and just put more of them on the sensor, which improves resolution. In this case Nokia has done the second thing.

But they’ve done it almost to an absurd amount, and they know that their lens, good as it is (and fairly fast — F/2.4 is solid, though there’s lots of distortion right now), can’t really resolve detail well enough that 41 megapixels would be necessary. Even on full-frame cameras that many pixels is questionable.

So instead of just bumping this one spec and expecting it to sell itself, they built a whole photo system around the idea. The 808 camera doesn’t take 41-megapixel photos; it collects 41 megapixels of data and uses all that data to create a very nice photo of a much smaller size. Imagine a photo around 8000×5000 pixels that isn’t particularly sharp; now shrink it down to something significantly smaller — maybe around 3000×2500 pixels (~8MP), just as an estimate. You do it intelligently, sharpening and de-aliasing and doing noise removal.

Here’s a rough estimate of the sizes (DPReview lists more specs):

They’re using 41 megapixels of raw material to give you 8 megapixels of product. And that 8 megapixel product is going to be significantly better than a “real” 8-megapixel image captured by a sensor a quarter the size of your pinky fingernail. Their camera really is better.

Of course, this comes with the standard caveat that independent testing must be done and what really matters is how it performs in everyday situations like dimly lit kitchens, restaurants, and out of the windows of cars. We’ll try it out ourselves, and will be sure to let you know if any more photographically-inclined authorities find out anything interesting.

The other shoe

And then there’s the handset itself. It’s chunky, it’s a weird shape, the camera sticks out the back. And it runs Symbian. Symbian! Why would Nokia do such a thing?

Because this project has been going on for five years, and five years ago the idea that Nokia and Symbian would be fighting for dear life wouldn’t quite have been believed. Nokia was still king of the world, iOS was just being born, and everyone was looking forward to Limo instead of Android.

They’re running it on Symbian because it was designed for Symbian, and it was too late to port the software and adapt the hardware to Windows Phone 7, which came along at the 11th hour, and at any rate the design spec for their Lumia phones would never have admitted a lens bump like the 808′s.

But they’re promising to bring the whole package to WP7 — which means Microsoft just got five years of Nokia R&D for free. It also means that if these guys play their cards right (a big “if”), WP7 could be the de facto gold standard for mobile photography in a year or two. When you consider how point and shoots are giving way to camera phones, and WP7 is aiming at the exact population that loves point and shoots, the pieces start looking very complementary indeed.

Nobody will buy the 808. It’s an evolutionary dead end. But the camera is a desirable trait that will be introduced to the Nokia-Microsoft hybrid soon — if either of these companies has any sense. Again, that’s a big if.

But this camera has restored some of my faith in Nokia and in mobile photography, something I trulydidn’t expect to happen any time soon, and not by them of all.

41MP Nokia 808 smartphone hints at pixel-binning future for small sensor cameras

Nokia has made the startling announcement that it has created a 41MP smartphone, the Nokia 808 PureView. Interestingly, in most shooting modes the camera will output 3, 5MP or 8MP stills, rather than offering its full resolution – promising greater quality and offering some clever features. And this isn’t a trade-show concept model, this is a product that will be offered to the public, though details of when and in which countries haven’t been announced. What’s interesting isn’t so much the pixel count as how it’s used, so we took a closer look.

The first thing to realize is that this isn’t a standard 1/3.2″ mobile phone sensor, it’s an unusual and remarkably large 1/1.2″ type (five times larger). In fact, it’s almost three times the size of the sensors in most compact cameras. As a result, its photosites are the same size as those in most 8.2MP cameraphone but the 808 doesn’t try to create an image of the same quality, 5 times bigger. Instead it oversamples the image and then pixel-bins down to a smaller size (though there is a special ‘creative’ shooting mode if you want the full resolution – 38MP at 4:3 aspect ratio, 36MP at 16:9).

Diagram showing the size of the Nokia 808 PureView’s 1/1.2″ sensor in comparison to those used in various compact cameras and mobile phones. A Four Thirds sensor is included for scale.

This pixel-binning means that noise (which occurs randomly) is averaged-out across multiple pixels (around 7-to-1 in the 5MP mode). The high native pixel count also means that it’s possible to effectively ‘zoom’ by cropping into the center of the image and reducing the number of pixels you average together. Consequently the 808 can offer a roughly 2.8x ‘zoom,’ while maintaining 5MP output, despite having a fixed lens. The image quality will drop (since the noise is no longer being averaged out), but it does mean you get a roughly 28-78mm equivalent zoom, without the need to have moving lens elements, making the process fast and silent. It also means the lens’ 15cm minimum focusing distance is maintained.

And, although the benefits of pixel-binning are lost as you magnify-in, because its photosites are the same size as contemporary 8MP phones, the resulting 5MP should offer the same pixel-level quality even at full magnification.

The same process allows 1080p video to be shot with a 4x cropping zoom.

Much like the Panasonic LX and GH cameras, the Nokia 808 uses an over-sized sensor to maximize the area used to offer different aspect-ratio images.

Despite the large sensor and comparatively large f/2.4 aperture, you won’t get much control over depth of field (it’ll be equivalent to setting an APS-C DSLR’s kit lens to 18mm f/5.6). The depth-of-field control is reduced still further when magnified-in, because it doesn’t gain the shallower depth of field that longer physical focal lengths usually bring. So, while it’s an improvement over most phones, we wouldn’t put much faith in the Nokia white paper’s talk of bokeh.

The interesting thing for us, though, is not the Panasonic-esque multi-aspect-ratio use of the sensor, nor the astonishing pixel count, it’s the idea of using that high pixel count to offer lower noise or non-interpolated digital zooming, while maintaining a constant image size. As Nokia’s blog points out:

‘5Mpix-6Mpix is more than enough for viewing images on PC, TV, online or smartphones. After all, how often do we print images bigger than even A4? [It] isn’t about shooting pictures the size of billboards! Instead, it’s about creating amazing pictures at normal, manageable sizes.’

And that’s something that might be interesting to see in future compact cameras – models that will concentrate on output of a sensible size so that the user can easily get the benefit of them oversampling the scene.

Click here to read Nokia’s blog post about the 808 PureView, which includes more detail about the phone’s other features.

And click here to read the company’s white-paper on the technology underpinning it.

Nokia 808 PureView lens and sensor specifications

  • Carl Zeiss Optics
  • Focal length: 8.02mm
  • 35mm equivalent focal length: 26mm, 16:9 | 28mm, 4:3
  • F-number: f/2.4
  • Focus range: 15cm – Infinity (throughout the zoom range)
  • Construction:
    • 5 elements, 1 group. All lens surfaces are aspherical
    • One high-index, low-dispersion glass mould lens
    • Mechanical shutter with neutral density filter
  • Optical format: 1/1.2”
  • Total number of pixels: 7728 x 5368
  • Pixel Size: 1.4um

Nokia’s sample images:

Nokia's sample images:

Nokia's sample images:

Nokia's sample images:

Nokia's sample images:

Nokia's sample images:

Nokia's sample images:

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: